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insult

in·sult • v. / inˈsəlt/ [tr.] speak to or treat with disrespect or scornful abuse: you're insulting the woman I love| [as adj.] (insulting) their language is crude and insulting to women. • n. / ˈinˌsəlt/ 1. a disrespectful or scornfully abusive remark or action: he hurled insults at us he saw the book as a deliberate insult to the Church. ∎  a thing so worthless or contemptible as to be offensive: the present offer is an absolute insult. 2. Med. an event or occurrence that causes damage to a tissue or organ: the movement of the bone causes a severe tissue insult. PHRASES: add insult to injury act in a way that makes a bad or displeasing situation worse.DERIVATIVES: in·sult·er n. in·sult·ing·ly adv. ORIGIN: mid 16th cent. (as a verb in the sense ‘exult, act arrogantly’): from Latin insultare ‘jump or trample on,’ from in- ‘on’ + saltare, from salire ‘to leap.’ The noun (in the early 17th cent. denoting an attack) is from French insulte or ecclesiastical Latin insultus. The main current senses date from the 17th cent., the medical use dating from the early 20th cent.

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insult

insult †glory or triumph over XVI; treat with scornful abuse or disrespect XVII. — L. insultāre, f. IN-1 + saltāre, iterative-intensive f. salīre leap, jump.
So insult (arch.) attack; affront. XVII. — F. insulte or — ecclL. insultus.

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insult

insult (in-sult) n. an injury or physical trauma.

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insult

insult •gestalt • asphalt •belt, Celt, dealt, dwelt, felt, gelt, knelt, melt, misdealt, pelt, Scheldt, smelt, spelt, svelte, veld, welt •fan belt • seat belt • lifebelt • sunbelt •rust belt • Copperbelt • heartfelt •underfelt • backveld • bushveld •Roosevelt •atilt, built, gilt, guilt, hilt, jilt, kilt, lilt, quilt, silt, spilt, stilt, tilt, upbuilt, wilt •Vanderbilt • volte •assault, Balt, exalt, fault, halt, malt, salt, smalt, vault •cobalt • stringhalt • basalt •somersault • polevault •bolt, colt, dolt, holt, jolt, moult (US molt), poult, smolt, volt •deadbolt • Humboldt • thunderbolt •megavolt • spoilt • Iseult •consult, cult, exult, indult, insult, penult, result, ult •adult • occult • tumult • catapult •difficult • Hasselt

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