Skip to main content
Select Source:

carotid

ca·rot·id / kəˈrätid/ • adj. of, relating to, or denoting the two main arteries that carry blood to the head and neck, and their two main branches. • n. each of these arteries. ORIGIN: early 17th cent.: from French carotide or modern Latin carotides, from Greek karōtides, plural of karōtis ‘drowsiness,’ from karoun ‘stupefy’ (because compression of these arteries was thought to cause stupor).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"carotid." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"carotid." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 22, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/carotid-0

"carotid." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 22, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/carotid-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

carotid body

carotid body One of a pair of tissue masses adjacent to the carotid sinus. Each contains receptors that are sensitive to oxygen and pH levels (acidity) in the blood. High levels of carbon dioxide in the blood lower the pH (i.e. increase the acidity). By responding to fluctuations in pH, the carotid body coordinates reflex changes in respiration rate. See also ventilation centre.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"carotid body." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"carotid body." A Dictionary of Biology. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 22, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/carotid-body

"carotid body." A Dictionary of Biology. . Retrieved April 22, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/carotid-body

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

carotid

carotid (anat.) name of the two great arteries supplying blood to the head. XVII. — F. carotide or modL. carōtides — Gr. karōtídes, pl. of karōtís, f. karoûn stupefy; so named because compression of these arteries was said to produce stupor.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"carotid." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"carotid." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 22, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/carotid-1

"carotid." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved April 22, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/carotid-1

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

carotid body

carotid body n. a small mass of tissue in the carotid sinus containing chemoreceptors that monitor levels of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen ions in the blood.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"carotid body." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"carotid body." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 22, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/carotid-body

"carotid body." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved April 22, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/carotid-body

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

carotid

carotidcaryatid, cravatted, dratted, fatted, matted •distracted, protracted •unadapted • Hampstead •downhearted, good-hearted, hard-hearted, heavy-hearted, kind-hearted, light-hearted, lion-hearted, overparted, tender-hearted, uncharted, warm-hearted, wholehearted •unplanted •fetid, indebted, minareted, rosetted •aspected, disaffected, disconnected, invected, unaffected, uncollected, unconnected, uncorrected, undetected, undirected, unelected, unexpected, uninflected, unprotected, unselected, unsuspected •unmelted •discontented, malcontented, unaccented, undented, under-represented, unfermented, unfrequented, unlamented, unrepresented, unscented •indigested, predigested, Quested, uncontested, undigested, unmolested, unrequested, untested •unprecedented • undocumented •unornamented •belated, elated, mismated, outdated, overinflated, striated, unabated, undated, unrated, unrelated, unstated, X-rated •sainted, unacquainted, unpainted, untainted •untasted • unmediated •ciliated, unaffiliated •fimbriated •historiated, storiated •unappropriated • glaciated •unsubstantiated • undifferentiated •unappreciated •uninitiated, unvitiated •unassociated • unalleviated •unpunctuated • unsegregated •uninvestigated • unmitigated •unexpurgated • dedicated •uncomplicated • elasticated •undomesticated • unsophisticated •self-educated, undereducated, uneducated •unreciprocated • unassimilated •pixilated • castellated • unventilated •unregulated • uninsulated •unarticulated • unmodulated •underpopulated, unpopulated •unformulated • mentholated •unconsummated • uncoordinated •unhyphenated • uncontaminated •unilluminated • opinionated •unanticipated • uncelebrated •unconsecrated • unsaturated •unliberated • uncorroborated •undecorated • unillustrated •unseparated • unincorporated •unadulterated • uncompensated •unpremeditated •self-motivated, unmotivated •uncultivated • antiquated •conceited, uncompleted, undefeated, unheated, untreated •half-witted, nitwitted, quick-witted, uncommitted, unfitted •ungifted •self-inflicted, unconstricted, unpredicted, unrestricted •stilted •unprinted, unstinted •unscripted •limp-wristed, tight-fisted, unassisted, unlisted, unresisted •uninhabited • uninhibited •uncredited, unedited •ringletted • limited • uncarpeted •unmerited •self-interested, uninterested •multifaceted • unsolicited • unvisited •benighted, clearsighted, shortsighted, uninvited, unlighted, unrequited, unsighted •foresighted •besotted, carotid, unspotted •unprompted • unwanted • unadopted •undistorted, unescorted, unreported, unsorted, unsupported •unsalted • undaunted • undoubted •unaccounted, uncounted, unmounted •sugarcoated • wonted • unexploited •self-appointed, unpointed •undiluted, undisputed, unpolluted, unsuited, voluted •convoluted • unexecuted •barefooted, club-footed, light-footed, splay-footed, sure-footed, wrong-footed •worsted •unattributed, undistributed •uninstructed, unobstructed, unreconstructed •uncorrupted, uninterrupted •maladjusted • untalented •uncovenanted • propertied •unwarranted • unpatented •concerted, uncontroverted, unconverted •extroverted • introverted

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"carotid." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"carotid." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 22, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/carotid

"carotid." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved April 22, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/carotid

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.