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sock

sock / säk/ • n. 1. a garment for the foot and lower part of the leg, typically knitted from wool, cotton, or nylon. ∎  a removable inner sole placed inside a shoe or boot for added warmth or to improve the fit. ∎  a white marking on the lower part of a horse's leg, not extending as far as the knee or hock.Compare with stocking. 2. inf. a hard blow: a sock on the jaw. ∎  force or emphasis: we have enough speed and sock in our lineup to score runs. • v. inf. [tr.] hit forcefully: Jess socked his father across the face. ∎  (often be socked with) affect disadvantageously: consumers have been socked with huge price increases. PHRASES: knock (or blow) someone's socks off inf. amaze or impress someone. knock the socks off inf. surpass or beat: it will knock the socks off the opposition. —— one's socks off inf. do something with great energy and enthusiasm: she acted her socks off. put a sock in it [usu. in imper.] Brit., inf. stop talking. sock and buskin archaic the theatrical profession; drama. sock it to someone inf. attack or make a forceful impression on someone.PHRASAL VERBS: sock something away put money aside as savings: you'll need to sock away about $900 a month. sock something in (or sock in) (of weather) envelop: the beach was socked in with fog.

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"sock." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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sock

sock1 †light shoe OE.; half-hose XIV; shoe worn by comic actors on the Greek and Roman stage XVI. OE. socc, corr. to MLG., MDu. socke (Du. sok), OHG. soch (G. socke), ON. sokkr; Gmc. — L. soccus — Gr. súkkhos, sukkhás.

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sock

sock a light shoe worn by comic actors on the ancient Greek and Roman stage; hence used allusively to denote comedy or the comic muse.
sock and buskin comedy and tragedy, the drama or theatrical profession as a whole.

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sock

sock2 (sl.) blow, beating; also vb. XVII. of unkn. orig.

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sock

sockad hoc, amok, Bangkok, baroque, belle époque, bloc, block, bock, brock, chock, chock-a-block, clock, cock, crock, doc, dock, floc, flock, frock, hock, hough, interlock, jock, knock, langue d'oc, lock, Locke, Médoc, mock, nock, o'clock, pock, post hoc, roc, rock, schlock, shock, smock, sock, Spock, stock, wok, yapok •manioc • Antioch • sjambok •gemsbok • rhebok • steenbok •springbok • grysbok • Lombok •Zadok • Languedoc •burdock, Murdoch •hollyhock • forehock • spatchcock •blackcock • Hancock • petcock •haycock • gamecock •Leacock, peacock, seacock •Hickok • Hitchcock • poppycock •stopcock • gorcock •Alcock, ballcock •monocoque • woodcock • shuttlecock •moorcock • weathercock

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