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Man Booker Prize

Man Booker Prize, a prize of £50,000 (originally £20,000) for the best novel of the year published in English in Great Britain; prior to 2014, it was only given to a British, Irish, or Commonwealth writer. Great Britain's premier literary award, it was originally known as the Booker Prize and in 1969 was underwritten by the British food-distribution company Booker PLC, later part of The Big Food Group PLC. In 2002 the Booker Foundation was created to award the prize, and the Man Group, a British hedge fund, became sponsor of the award, which was renamed. Recipients of the award have included V. S. Naipaul, Nadine Gordimer, Iris Murdoch, Salman Rushdie, A. S. Byatt, J. M. Coetzee, Peter Carey, Ian McEwan, Margaret Atwood, and Julian Barnes.

The Man Booker International Prize was introduced in 2004. Originally given for overall achievement in fiction, it was presented every two years to a living author of any nationality whose fiction was either written in English or was generally available in English translation. It was first given (2005) to the Albanian novelist Ismail Kadare and was subsequently awarded to Nigerian Chinua Achebe, Canadian Alice Munro, Americans Philip Roth and Lydia Davis, and Hungarian László Krasznahorkai. In 2015 the award was made an annual prize (from 2016) for the best novel published in English translation in Great Britain, with the prize money of £50,000 to be shared by the author and translator.

The Man Asian Literary Prize was founded by the Hong Kong International Literary Festival with the financial support of the Man Group. Awarded for the years 2007–12, it aimed to bring new Asian writers to the attention of the world literary community, to encourage the translation and publication in English of such writers' works, and to emphasize Asia's increasing role in world literature.

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Booker Prize

Booker Prize British literary prize. The Booker is the most prestigious award for new English-language novels published by UK, Commonwealth or Irish writers. The annual award generates much media attention, controversy and increased sales for short-listed writers. Recipients of the prize, first presented in 1969, have included Kazuo Ishiguro, Iris Murdoch, V. S. Naipaul and Pat Barker. In 1993 Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children won the ‘Booker of Bookers’.

Year

Writer and title

1986

Kingsley Amis The Old Devils

1987

Penelope Lively Moon Tiger

1988

Peter Carey Oscar and Lucinda

1989

Kazuo Ishiguro The Remains of the Day

1990

A. S. Byatt Possession

1991

Ben Okri The Famished Road

1992

Michael Ondaatje The English Patient

Barry Unsworth Sacred Hunger

1993

Roddy Doyle Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha

1994

James Kelman How Late It Was, How Late

1995

Pat Barker The Ghost Road

1996

Graham Swift Last Orders

1997

Arundhati Roy The God of Small Things

1998

Ian McEwan Amsterdam

1999

J. M. Coetzee Disgrace

2000

Margaret Atwood The Blind Assassin

2001

Peter Carey The True History of the Kelly Gang

2002

Yan Matel Life of Pi

2003

DBC Pierre Vernon God Little


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Booker Prize

Booker Prize a literary prize awarded annually for a novel published by a British or Commonwealth citizen during the previous year, financed by the multinational company Booker McConnell. Now known as the Man Booker Prize.

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Booker Prize

Booker Prize: see Man Booker Prize.

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