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compare

com·pare / kəmˈpe(ə)r/ • v. [tr.] 1. estimate, measure, or note the similarity or dissimilarity between: individual schools compared their facilities with those of others in the area. ∎  (compare something to) point out the resemblances to; liken to: her novel was compared to the work of Daniel Defoe. ∎  (compare something to) draw an analogy between one thing and (another) for the purposes of explanation or clarification: he compared the religions to different paths toward the peak of the same mountain. ∎  [intr.] have a specified relationship with another thing or person in terms of nature or quality: salaries compare favorably with those of other professions. ∎  [intr.] be of an equal or similar nature or quality: sales cannot compare with the glory days of 1989. 2. (usu. be compared) Gram. form the comparative and superlative degrees of (an adjective or an adverb): words of one syllable are usually compared by “-er” and “-est.” PHRASES: beyond (or without) compare of a quality or nature surpassing all others of the same kind: a diamond beyond compare. compare notes (of two or more people) exchange ideas, opinions, or information about a particular subject.

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compare

compare represent as similar. XV (earlier comper XIV). — (O)F. comparer (earlier comperer) :- L. comparāre pair, match, f. compar like, equal, f. COM- + pār equal (see PEER 1).
So comparative XV. — L. comparātīvus, f. comparāre, -āt-. comparison XIV. — OF. comparesoun (mod. -aison) :- L. comparatiō, -ōn- (see -ATION).

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compare

compareaffair, affaire, air, Altair, Althusser, Anvers, Apollinaire, Astaire, aware, Ayer, Ayr, bare, bear, bêche-de-mer, beware, billionaire, Blair, blare, Bonaire, cafetière, care, chair, chargé d'affaires, chemin de fer, Cher, Clair, Claire, Clare, commissionaire, compare, concessionaire, cordon sanitaire, couvert, Daguerre, dare, debonair, declare, derrière, despair, doctrinaire, éclair, e'er, elsewhere, ensnare, ere, extraordinaire, Eyre, fair, fare, fayre, Finisterre, flair, flare, Folies-Bergère, forbear, forswear, foursquare, glair, glare, hair, hare, heir, Herr, impair, jardinière, Khmer, Kildare, La Bruyère, lair, laissez-faire, legionnaire, luminaire, mal de mer, mare, mayor, meunière, mid-air, millionaire, misère, Mon-Khmer, multimillionaire, ne'er, Niger, nom de guerre, outstare, outwear, pair, pare, parterre, pear, père, pied-à-terre, Pierre, plein-air, prayer, questionnaire, rare, ready-to-wear, rivière, Rosslare, Santander, savoir faire, scare, secretaire, share, snare, solitaire, Soufrière, spare, square, stair, stare, surface-to-air, swear, Tailleferre, tare, tear, their, there, they're, vin ordinaire, Voltaire, ware, wear, Weston-super-Mare, where, yeah

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