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tread

tread / tred/ • v. (past trod / träd/ / träd/ ; past part. trod·den / ˈträdn/ or trod) [intr.] walk in a specified way: he trod lightly, trying to make as little contact with the mud as possible | fig. the administration had to tread carefully so as not to offend the judiciary. ∎  (tread on) set one's foot down on top of. ∎  [tr.] walk on or along: shoppers will soon be treading the floors of the new shopping mall. ∎  [tr.] press down into the ground or another surface with the feet: food and cigarette butts had been trodden into the carpet. ∎  [tr.] crush or flatten something with the feet: the snow had been trodden down by the horses| [as adj.] (trodden) she stood on the floor of trodden earth. • n. 1. [in sing.] a manner or the sound of someone walking: I heard the heavy tread of Dad's boots. 2. the top surface of a step or stair. 3. the thick molded part of a vehicle tire that grips the road. ∎  the part of a wheel that touches the ground or rail. ∎  the upper surface of a railroad track, in contact with the wheels. ∎  the part of the sole of a shoe that rests on the ground. PHRASES: tread the boards (or stage) see board. tread on someone's toessee step on someone's toes at step. tread water (past tread·ed ) maintain an upright position in deep water by moving the feet with a walking movement and the hands with a downward circular motion. ∎ fig. fail to advance or make progress: men who are treading water in their careers. DERIVATIVES: tread·er n.

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"tread." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"tread." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved February 22, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tread-0

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tread

tread pt. trod, pp. trodden step or walk upon; intr. with on, upon OE.; thresh by trampling XIV. OE. str. vb. tredan = OS. tredan (Du. treden), OHG. tretan (G. treten) :- WGmc. *tredan; cf. wk. grade Gmc. *truð repr. by ON. troða, Goth. trudan.
Hence tread sb. XIII. Comps. treadmill XIX, treadwheel XVI.

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tread

tread. See stair.

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"tread." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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tread

treadabed, ahead, bed, behead, Birkenhead, bled, bread, bred, coed, cred, crossbred, dead, dread, Ed, embed, Enzed, fed, fled, Fred, gainsaid, head, infrared, ked, lead, led, Med, misled, misread, Ned, outspread, premed, pure-bred, read, red, redd, said, samoyed, shed, shred, sked, sled, sped, Spithead, spread, stead, ted, thread, tread, underbred, underfed, wed •trackbed • flatbed • deathbed •airbed • daybed • seabed •reed bed, seedbed •sickbed • childbed • hotbed • roadbed •footbed • sunbed • sofa bed •waterbed • feather bed • breastfed •dripfed • spoonfed • Szeged •blackhead •cathead, fathead, Flathead •masthead •bedhead, deadhead, redhead •egghead •airhead, stairhead •railhead • maidenhead • Gateshead •beachhead • greenhead • meathead •bighead • bridgehead •dickhead, thickhead •pinhead, skinhead •pithead • Holyhead • sleepyhead •fountainhead • whitehead • godhead •blockhead •drophead, hophead, mophead •hothead • hogshead •sorehead, warhead •Roundhead • bonehead • arrowhead •bullhead • wooden-head • sub-head •bulkhead •chucklehead, knucklehead •drumhead • muttonhead • spearhead •go-ahead • dunderhead • figurehead •loggerhead • hammerhead •letterhead • bobsled • cirriped • biped •moped • quadruped

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