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stud

stud1 / stəd/ • n. 1. a large-headed piece of metal that pierces and projects from a surface, esp. for decoration. ∎  a small, simple piece of jewelry for wearing in pierced ears or nostrils. ∎  a fastener consisting of two buttons joined with a bar, used in formal wear to fasten a shirtfront or to fasten a collar to a shirt. ∎  (usu. studs) a small projection fixed to the base of footwear, esp. athletic shoes, to allow the wearer to grip the ground. ∎  (usu. studs) a small metal piece set into the tire of a motor vehicle to improve roadholding in slippery conditions. 2. an upright support in the wall of a building to which laths and plasterboard are attached. ∎  the height of a room as indicated by the length of this. 3. a rivet or crosspiece in each link of a chain cable. • v. (stud·ded , stud·ding ) [tr.] (usu. be studded) decorate or augment (something) with many studs or similar small objects: a dagger studded with precious diamonds. ∎  strew or cover (something) with a scattering of small objects or features: the sky was clear and studded with stars. stud2 • n. 1. an establishment where horses or other domesticated animals are kept for breeding: [as adj.] a stud farm | the horse was retired to stud. ∎  a collection of horses or other domesticated animals belonging to one person. ∎  (also stud horse) a stallion. ∎ inf. a young man thought to be very active sexually or regarded as a good sexual partner. 2. (also stud poker) a form of poker in which the first card of a player's hand is dealt face down and the others face up, with betting after each round of the deal.

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stud

stud. In timber framing, a subsidiary (usually vertical) member (or scantling) in a wall or partition. In close-studding the spaces between studs are about the same in width as the studs themselves, a profligate use of material intended for show rather than for any practical purpose. Herringbone-studding is set at an angle (usually 45°) to the posts, filling the space framed by the posts and rails. A cruck-stud is set on and fixed to the outside of a cruck blade.

Bibliography

Alcock,, Barley,, Dixon,, & and Meeson (1996)

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Stud

Stud

a collection of horses or other animals kept for breeding, racing, or riding. See also stable, string.

Examples : stud of colts and good mares, 1400; of dogs; of greyhounds, 1828; of horses, 1611; of maresBrewer ; of motorcars, 1907; of partridges, 1854; of poker players; of racehorses; of sows, 1813.

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stud

stud2 establishment for breeding of horses OE.; horses bred by or belonging to one person XVII. OE. stōd, corr. to MLG stōlt, OHG stuot (G. stute mare), ON. stōð :- Gmc. *stōðam, *stōðō. f. *stō STAND.

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stud

stud1
A. †post, prop (later as in a building) OE.,

B. knob, boss, or nail head XV; adjustable button XVI. OE. studu = MHG. stud, ON. stoð, rel. to G. stützen prop, support.

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stud

studblood, bud, crud, cud, dud, flood, Judd, mud, rudd, scud, spud, stud, sudd, thud •redbud • lifeblood •stick-in-the-mud

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