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into

in·to / ˈintoō/ • prep. 1. expressing movement or action with the result that someone or something becomes enclosed or surrounded by something else: cover the bowl and put it into the fridge Sara got into her car and shut the door | fig. he walked into a trap sprung by the opposition. 2. expressing movement or action with the result that someone or something makes physical contact with something else: he crashed into a parked car. 3. indicating a route by which someone or something may arrive at a particular destination: the narrow road that led down into the village. 4. indicating the direction toward which someone or something is turned when confronting something else: with the wind blowing into your face sobbing into her skirt. 5. indicating an object of attention or interest: a clearer insight into what is involved an inquiry into the squad's practices. 6. expressing a change of state: a peaceful protest which turned into a violent confrontation the fruit can be made into jam. 7. expressing the result of an action: they forced the club into a humiliating and expensive special general meeting. 8. expressing division: three into twelve equals four. 9. inf. (of a person) taking a lively and active interest in (something): he's into surfing.

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