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every

every every little helps often used to introduce a small contribution. The saying is recorded in English from the early 17th century, but a similar saying is found in late 16th-century French: ‘every little helps, said the ant, pissing into the sea at middday.’
every man for himself a statement of essential self-interest which is often extended (see every man for himself, and devil take the hindmost, and every man for himself, and God for us all). The saying is recorded from the late 14th century.
every man for himself, and devil take the hindmost the bare statement of self-interest is extended to explicit disregard for the welfare of anyone who cannot fend for themselves. The saying is recorded from the mid 16th century.
See also every man for himself.every man for himself, and God for us all ultimately God is concerned for humankind while individuals are concerned only for themselves. The saying is recorded from the mid 16th century.
See also every man for himself.every man has his price everyone is susceptible to the right bribe. The saying is recorded from the mid 18th century, and the English Whig statesman Robert Walpole (1676–1745) is reported as saying of fellow parliamentarians, ‘All those men have their price.’
every man is the architect of his own fortune each person is ultimately responsible for what happens to them. The saying is recorded in English from the mid 16th century, but is found earlier in Latin as a saying of the Roman censor Appius Claudius Caecus (4th–3rd century bc), ‘but experience has shown what Appius said in his verses to be true, that each man is the architect of his own fortune.’ Coinage of the term is sometimes misattributed to Bacon.
every man to his taste often used to comment on someone else's choice. The saying is recorded from the late 16th century, and the French equivalent is, ‘chacun à son goût [each to his taste].’
every man to his trade one should operate within one's own area of expertise. The saying is recorded from the late 16th century, and is often used with biblical allusion to 1 Corinthians 7:20, ‘Let every man abide in the same calling wherein he was called.’

See also every bullet has its billet, every cloud has a silver lining, every cock will crow upon his own dunghill, every dog is allowed one bite, every Jack has his Jill, every land has its own law, every trick in the book.

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