Skip to main content
Select Source:

trick

trick / trik/ • n. 1. a cunning or skillful act or scheme intended to deceive or outwit someone: he's a double-dealer capable of any mean trick. ∎  a mischievous practical joke: she thought Elaine was playing some trick on her. ∎  a skillful act performed for entertainment or amusement: he did conjuring tricks for his daughters. ∎  an illusion: I thought I saw a flicker of emotion, but it was probably a trick of the light. ∎  a clever or particular way of doing something: the trick is to put one ski forward and kneel. 2. a peculiar or characteristic habit or mannerism: she had a trick of clipping off certain words and phrases. 3. (in bridge, whist, and similar card games) a sequence of cards forming a single round of play. One card is laid down by each player, the highest card being the winner. 4. inf. a prostitute's client. 5. a sailor's turn at the helm, usually lasting for two or four hours. • v. [tr.] 1. (often be tricked) deceive or outwit (someone) by being cunning or skillful: buyers can be tricked by savvy sellers. ∎  (trick someone into) use deception to make someone do (something): he tricked her into parting with the money. ∎  (trick someone out of) use deception to deprive someone of (something): the king was tricked out of his land. 2. Heraldry sketch (a coat of arms) in outline, with the colors indicated by letters or signs. • adj. 1. intended or used to deceive or mystify, or to create an illusion: a trick question. 2. liable to fail; defective: a trick knee. PHRASES: do the trick inf. achieve the required result. every trick in the book inf. every available method of achieving what one wants.how's tricks? inf. used as a friendly greeting: “How's tricks in your neck of the woods?” not miss a tricksee miss1 . the oldest trick in the book a ruse so hackneyed that it should no longer deceive anyone. trick or treat a children's custom of calling at houses at Halloween with the threat of pranks if they are not given a small gift (often used as a greeting by children doing this). tricks of the trade special ingenious techniques used in a profession or craft, esp. those that are little known by outsiders. turn a trick inf. (of a prostitute) have a session with a client. up to one's (old) tricks inf. misbehaving in a characteristic way.PHRASAL VERBS: trick someone/something out (or up) (usu. be tricked out) dress or decorate someone or something in an elaborate or showy way: a Marine tricked out in World War II kit and weaponry. DERIVATIVES: trick·er n. trick·ish adj. ( dated ).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"trick." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 May. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"trick." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/trick-1

"trick." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved May 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/trick-1

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

trick

trick every trick in the book every available method of achieving what one wants.
not miss a trick never fail to take advantage of a situation.
the oldest trick in the book a ruse so hackneyed that it should no longer deceive anyone.
there are tricks in every trade proverbial saying, mid 17th century; meaning that the practise of every skill is likely to involve some trickery or dishonesty.
trick or treat a children's custom of calling at houses at Halloween with the threat of pranks if they are not given a small gift (often used as a greeting by children doing this); the practice is first recorded in the US in the mid 20th century.

See also you can't teach an old dog new tricks.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"trick." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 May. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"trick." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/trick

"trick." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved May 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/trick

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

trick

trick
A. crafty or mean device XV; dexterous artifice XVI;

B. (bad or unpleasant) habit XVI;

C. (her.) sketch of a coat of arms XVI;

D. cards played and won in a round XVI. — OF. trique, dial. var. of triche, f. trichier (mod. tricher) deceive, cheat.
Hence (presumably) trick vb. A. cheat; B. attire, deck; C. sketch, draw in outline. XVI. trickery XVIII. tricksy (-SY) smart, spruce XVI; playful, whimsical; ticklish XIX. tricky (-Y1) deceitful XVIII; difficult to handle XIX.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"trick." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 May. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"trick." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/trick-2

"trick." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved May 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/trick-2

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

trick

trickartic, brick, chick, click, crick, dick, flick, hand-pick, hic, hick, kick, lick, mick, miskick, nick, pic, pick, prick, quick, rick, shtick, sic, sick, slick, snick, spic, stick, thick, tic, tick, trick, Vic, wick •alcaic, algebraic, Aramaic, archaic, choleraic, Cyrenaic, deltaic, formulaic, Hebraic, Judaic, Mishnaic, Mithraic, mosaic, Pharisaic, prosaic, Ptolemaic, Romaic, spondaic, stanzaic, trochaic •logorrhoeic (US logorrheic), mythopoeic, onomatopoeic •echoic, heroic, Mesozoic, Palaeozoic (US Paleozoic), Stoic •Bewick •disyllabic, monosyllabic, polysyllabic, syllabic •choriambic, dithyrambic, iambic •alembic •amoebic (US amebic) •aerobic, agoraphobic, claustrophobic, homophobic, hydrophobic, phobic, technophobic, xenophobic •cherubic, cubic, pubic •Arabic, Mozarabic •acerbic • apparatchik • dabchick •peachick

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"trick." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 May. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"trick." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/trick-0

"trick." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved May 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/trick-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.