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Pennsylvania Troops, Mutinies of

PENNSYLVANIA TROOPS, MUTINIES OF

PENNSYLVANIA TROOPS, MUTINIES OF. On 1 January 1781, Pennsylvania troops stationed at Morristown, New Jersey, mutinied. They killed or wounded several officers, and demanded that the Continental Congress furnish back pay, food and clothing, and adjust enlistment terms. On 11 January, the troops met with Joseph Reed, president of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania and agreed to a modified list of demands.

On 13 June 1783, some Pennsylvania troops in Philadelphia presented a memorial demanding pay due them. Congress, then sitting in Philadelphia, did not resolve the issue and on 21 June the soldiers held a public demonstration. Hearing of the approach of troops however, they dispersed or surrendered.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Carp, E. Wayne. To Starve the Army at Pleasure: Continental Army Administration and American Political Culture, 1775–1783. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1984.

Neimeyer, Charles Patrick. America Goes to War: A Social History of the Continental Army. New York: New York University Press, 1996.

Royster, Charles. A Revolutionary People at War: The Continental Army and American Character, 1775–1783. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1979.

Thomas RobsonHay/t. d.

See alsoNewburgh Addresses ; Revolution, American: Military History .

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