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Roberts, John 1956–

Roberts, John 1956–

(J. D. Roberts)

PERSONAL

Original name, John Robertson; born November 15, 1956, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada; married, wife's name Michelle; children: two. Education: Attended University of Toronto.

Addresses:

Office—Cable News Network, 820 First Ave. NE, Washington, DC 20002–4243.

Career:

Broadcast journalist. Worked as music announcer at CFOS–Radio and CHYM–Radio in Canada, 1970; CJBK–Radio, London, Ontario, Canada, broad-caster, 1977; CHUM–Radio, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, overnight music announcer, 1977–79; City TV, Toronto, news anchor and correspondent, 1979–89, video music announcer for MuchMusic Channel, 1985; WCIX–TV (now WFOR–TV), Miami, FL, anchor and correspondent, 1989–91; Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS), member of news staff, 1991–2006, coanchor of evening news programs, 1994–95, chief White House correspondent, 1999–2006, also coanchor of Sunday broadcasts and substitute anchor of other programs; Cable News Network, Washington, DC, member of news staff, 2006—. Appeared in Canada as J. D. Roberts.

Awards, Honors:

Three national Emmy Awards for coverage of Atlanta Olympic park bombing, the death of Princess Diana, and a Trans World Airlines plane crash; New York Press Club Award.

CREDITS

Television Appearances; Series:

(As J. D. Roberts) Cohost, The New Music, City TV (Canada), 1979–88.

(As J. D. Roberts) Entertainment anchor, CityPulse News, City TV, 1981–88.

(As J. D. Roberts) News anchor, CityPulse News, City TV, 1988–89.

(As J. D. Roberts) Cohost, Canada A.M. (also known as Canada A.M. Weekend), CTV, 1990–92.

Coanchor, The CBS Morning News, CBS, 1992–94.

Host, Under Fire, 1996–97.

Chief White House correspondent and substitute anchor, CBS Evening News with Dan Rather, CBS, 1999–2005.

Senior national correspondent and anchor, This Week at War, Cable News Network, 2006.

Television Appearances; Specials:

Woodstock: The Lost Performances, Showtime, 1994.

Correspondent, 1996 Republican National Convention, CBS, 1996.

Correspondent, 1996 Democratic National Convention, CBS, 1996.

Narrator, The Young Kennedys, The Learning Channel, 1998.

Narrator, Merv Griffin: Master of the Game, Arts and Entertainment, 1998.

Narrator, Ed Asner: Lovable Grouch, Arts and Entertainment, 1998.

Narrator, Sally Jessy Raphael: Behind the Red Glasses, Arts and Entertainment, 1999.

Narrator, Bob Fosse: Dancing on the Edge, Arts and Entertainment, 1999.

Narrator, The America's Busiest E.R., The Discovery Channel, 2000.

Narrator, Hunt for the Killer Flu, Arts and Entertainment, 2000.

Narrator, Gerald Ford: Healing the Presidency, Arts and Entertainment, 2000.

Correspondent, Election Night 2000, CBS, 2000.

Anchor, 48 Hours: Katrina's Fury, CBS, 2004.

Correspondent, 48 Hours: Disaster in the Delta, CBS, 2005.

Television Appearances; Episodic:

Chief White House correspondent and substitute anchor, CBS Evening News with Bob Schieffer, CBS, 2005.

Face the Nation, CBS, 2005.

American Morning, Cable News Network, 2006.

Guest, Larry King Live, Cable News Network, 2006.

Guest, Anderson Cooper 360 Degrees, Cable News Network, 2006.

Film Appearances:

(Uncredited) Himself (in archive footage), Fahrenheit 9/11, IFC Films/Lions Gate Films, 2004.

OTHER SOURCES

Periodicals:

TV Guide, December, 2004, p. 6.

Electronic:

CNN Online,http://www.cnn.com, September 13, 2006.

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