Lamb, Edward Buckton

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Lamb, Edward Buckton (1806–69). English Rogue Gothic Revivalist, his elephantine churches tend to have centralized plans and frenetically busy timber roofs: examples are St Margaret's, Leiston, Suffolk (1853), and St Mary Magdalene, Canning Road, Addiscombe, Croydon, Surrey (1868–70). His work attracted opprobrium, notably in The Ecclesiologist, and he seems to have been untouched by more conventional tastes of the time. He produced many drawings for Loudon's Encyclopaedia (1833), and published books on Gothic Ornament (1830), Ancient Domestic Architecture (1846), and many articles in Architectural Magazine (1834–8), as well as a memoir of Loudon. He refashioned Hughenden Manor, Bucks. (1863–6), for Benjamin Disraeli (1804–81), and designed the Town Halls in Eye, Suffolk (1857—Pevsner thought it ‘horrible’), and Berkhamsted, Herts. (1859).

Bibliography

J. Curl (1995 b&c);
Dinsmoor & and Muthesius (1985);
Girouard (1979);
Loudon (1834, 1981);
RIBA Journal (Journal of the Royal Institute of British Architects), ser. 3, 56/6 (1949), 251–9