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Graham, James Gillespie

Graham, James Gillespie (1776–1855). Scots architect. He had a large practice, specializing in castellated country-houses and Gothic churches. The former were essentially symmetrical, with a nod to the Picturesque by means of round towers to one side, but had plainish exteriors, although interiors frequently had impressive Gothic treatments. Among his houses Achnacarry, Invernessshire (1802–5), Armadale Castle, Skye (1814–22), Duns Castle, Berwickshire (1818–22), and Dunninald, Craig, Angus (1823–4), may be mentioned. His best Gothic works are probably the R. C. Cathedral, Glasgow (1814–22), and the steeple at Montrose, Angus (1832–4— based on a precedent at Louth, Lincs.). His most distinguished Classical essays are Gray's Hospital, Elgin, Morayshire (1812–5), the layout and design of the Moray Estate, Edinburgh New Town (1821–8—with the polygonal Moray Place), and a street-plan for Birkenhead, Ches. (1825–8), of which only Hamilton Square appears to have been developed according to his designs (1825–44). He was probably the first to use the term Baronial (1813, 1846). He was probably the first to use the term Baronial (1813, 1846). He appears to have had some sort of business arrangement with David Rhind.

Bibliography

Colvin (1995);
Macaulay (1975);
Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004);
Youngson (1966)

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