cryolite

All Sources -
Updated Media sources (1) About encyclopedia.com content Print Topic Share Topic
views updated

cryolite Mineral, Na3AlF6; sp. gr. 3.0; hardness 2.5; monoclinic; colourless to white, sometimes brown to reddish; white streak; vitreous to greasy lustre; crystals rare, but cubic-like and hexahedral, also occurs massive; no cleavage, basal parting and poor prismatic parting; occurs in pegmatites that have been enriched with fluorine, and in association with siderite, quartz, galena, chalcopyrite, fluorite, and cassiterite. The powder becomes almost invisible in water due to its low refractive index. Synthetic cryolite is used as a flux in the production of aluminium and enamels.

views updated

cryolite •halite • candlelight • fanlight •lamplight • gaslight • flashlight •starlight • headlight • penlight •daylight • tail light •Peelite, pelite •street light • phyllite • rubellite •Carmelite • proselyte • Monothelite •highlight, skylight, stylite, twilight •sidelight • limelight • night light •spotlight • torchlight • lowlight •cryolite • microlight • moonlight •cellulite • floodlight • sunlight •rushlight • Pre-Raphaelite • firelight •acolyte • Bakelite • Armalite •Ishmaelite • phonolite • cosmopolite •electrolyte • Israelite • corallite •heteroclite • chrysolite • socialite •satellite • tantalite • overflight •pearlite, perlite •searchlight

views updated

cryolite or kryolite (both: krī´əlīt´) [Gr.,=frost stone], mineral usually pure white or colorless but sometimes tinted in shades of pink, brown, or even black and having a luster like that of wax. Chemically, it is a double fluoride of sodium and aluminum, Na3AlF6. Its principal use is as a flux in the smelting of aluminum. It is used also as a source of soda, aluminum salts, fluorides, and hydrofluoric acid (by the action of sulfuric acid). It was discovered in Greenland in 1794 and occurs almost nowhere else. Cryolite has been produced synthetically.