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reserve

re·serve / riˈzərv/ • v. [tr.] refrain from using or disposing of (something); retain for future use: roll out half the dough and reserve the other half. ∎  arrange for (a room, seat, ticket, etc.) to be kept for the use of a particular person and not given to anyone else: a place was reserved for her in the front row. ∎  retain or hold (an entitlement to something), esp. by formal or legal stipulation: [tr.] the editor reserves the right to edit letters. ∎  refrain from delivering (a judgment or decision) immediately or without due consideration or evidence: I'll reserve my views on his ability until he's played again. ∎  (reserve something for) use or engage in something only in or at (a particular circumstance or time): Japanese food has been presented as expensive and reserved for special occasions. ∎  (in church use) retain (a portion of the consecrated elements) after mass for communion of the sick or as a focus for devotion. • n. 1. (often reserves) a supply of a commodity not needed for immediate use but available if required: Australia has major coal, gas, and uranium reserves. ∎  a force or body of troops kept back from action to reinforce or protect others, or additional to the regular forces and available in an emergency. ∎  a member of the military reserve. ∎  an extra player who is a possible substitute in a team. ∎  (the reserves) the second-string team. ∎  funds kept available by a bank, company, or government: the foreign exchange reserves. ∎  a part of a company's profits added to capital rather than paid as a dividend. 2. a place set aside for special use, in particular: ∎  an area designated as a habitat for a native people. ∎  a protected area for wildlife. 3. a lack of warmth or openness in manner or expression: she smiled and some of her natural reserve melted. ∎  qualification or doubt attached to some statement or claim: she trusted him without reserve. 4. short for reserve price. 5. (in the decoration of ceramics or textiles) an area that still has the original color of the material or the color of the background. PHRASES: in reserve unused and available if required: the platoon that had been kept in reserve.DERIVATIVES: re·serv·a·ble adj. re·serv·er n.

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"reserve." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"reserve." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/reserve

"reserve." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/reserve

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reserve

reserve Resources of coal, ore, or minerals which can be mined legally and profitably under existing conditions. The indicated reserve is the estimate of ore computed from boreholes, outcrops, and developmental data, and projected for a reasonable distance on geologic evidence. An inferred reserve is an estimate based on relationships, character of deposit, and past experience, without actual measurements or samples; it should include the limits between which the deposit may lie. A potential reserve is ore not yet discovered but whose presence is suspected; the term is sometimes used for ore not commercially viable at the present time. A proved reserve is a resource reliably established by tunnels, bore-holes, or mining.

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"reserve." A Dictionary of Ecology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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reserve

reserve Resources of coal, ore, or minerals which can be mined legally and profitably under existing conditions. The indicated reserve is the estimate of ore computed from boreholes, outcrops, and developmental data, and projected for a reasonable distance on geologic evidence. An inferred reserve is an estimate based on relationships, character of deposit, and past experience, without actual measurements or samples; it should include the limits between which the deposit may lie. A potential reserve is ore not yet discovered but whose presence is suspected; the term is sometimes used for ore not commercially viable at present time. A proved reserve is a resource reliably established by tunnels, boreholes, or mining.

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Reserve

RESERVE

Funds set aside to cover future expenses, losses, or claims. To retain; to keep in store for future or special use; to postpone to a future time.

A legal reserve is a monetary account required by law to be established by insurance companies and banks as protection against losses.

A trial court reserves a point of law by setting it aside for future consideration and allowing the trial to proceed as if the question had been resolved, subject to alteration of the judgment in the event the court en banc decides the question differently.

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"Reserve." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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reserve

reserve keep for future use; keep or set apart. XIV. — (O)F. réserver — L. reservāre, f. RE- + servāre keep, save.
Hence sb. A. something reserved; (mil., pl. and sg.) force(s) kept in reserve (whence reservist XIX) XVII; B. self-restraint XVII. So reservation XIV. — (O)F. or late L.

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"reserve." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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