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cirrus

cirrus(plural cirri) A Latin word meaning ‘a tuft or lock of hair’.

1. A cloud type that comprises high-level, banded clouds in fibrous filaments aligned approximately along their line of movement. See also cloud classification.

2. In certain ciliate protozoa, an organelle formed by the fusion of a group of cilia (see cilium), which usually functions in locomotion or feeding.

3. In many invertebrates, a slender bodily appendage, often resembling a tentacle. In polychaete worms (Polychaeta) it bears cilia (see cilium).

4. In some flatworms and trematodes, an eversible copulatory organ.

5. In some fishes (e.g. Creediidae) a tuft of skin on the jaw.

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cirrus

cir·rus / ˈsirəs/ • n. (pl. cir·ri / ˈsirˌī; ˈsirē/ ) 1. cloud forming wispy filamentous tufted streaks (“mare's tails”) at high altitude, usually 16,500–45,000 feet (5–13 km). 2. Zool. a slender tendril or hairlike filament, such as the appendage of a barnacle, the barbel of a fish, or the intromittent organ of an earthworm. ∎  Bot. a tendril.

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cirrus

cirrus
1. (pl. cirri) In certain ciliate protozoa, an organelle, formed by the fusion of a group of cilia, which usually functions in locomotion.

2. In many invertebrates, a slender bodily appendage, often resembling a tentacle. In Polychaeta it bears cilia.

3. In some flatworms and trematodes, an eversible copulatory organ.

4. In some fishes (e.g. Creediidae) a tuft of skin on the jaw.

5. See CIRRIPEDIA.

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cirrus

cirrus (plural cirri) From the Latin cirrus, meaning a tuft or lock of hair.

1. A cloud type comprising high-level, banded clouds in fibrous filaments aligned approximately along their line of movement. See also CLOUD CLASSIFICATION.

2. In certain ciliate protozoa, an organelle formed by the fusion of a group of cilia, which usually functions in locomotion or feeding.

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cirrus

cirrus (bot.) tendril; (zool.) filamentary appendage XVIII; form of cloud having the appearance of wisps XIX. — L., ‘curl’, comb. form cirro- (see -o-), as in cirro-cumulus, -stratus XIX.

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cirrus

cirrus See CALAMUS; CERATOLOBUS; and DAEMONOROPS.

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cirrus

cirrusArras, embarrass, harass •gynandrous, polyandrous •Pancras • charas • Tatras • disastrous •ferrous • leprous • ambidextrous •Carreras, mayoress •scabrous •cirrus, Pyrrhus •chivalrous •citrous, citrus •ludicrous • tenebrous •Cyrus, Epirus, papyrus, virus •fibrous • hydrous • Cyprus •retrovirus • monstrous •brachiosaurus, brontosaurus, canorous, chorus, Epidaurus, Horus, megalosaurus, pelorus, porous, sorus, stegosaurus, Taurus, thesaurus, torus, tyrannosaurus •walrus •ochrous (US ocherous) •cumbrous • wondrous • lustrous •Algeciras, Severus •desirous •Arcturus, Epicurus, Honduras •barbarous • tuberous • slumberous •Cerberus • rapturous •lecherous, treacherous •torturous • vulturous • Pandarus •slanderous • ponderous •malodorous, odorous •thunderous • murderous •carboniferous, coniferous, cruciferous, melliferous, odoriferous, pestiferous, somniferous, splendiferous, umbelliferous, vociferous •phosphorous, phosphorus •sulphurous (US sulfurous) •Anaxagoras, Pythagorasclangorous, languorous •rigorous, vigorous •dangerous • verdurous •cankerous, cantankerous, rancorous •decorous • Icarus • valorous •dolorous • idolatrous •amorous, clamorous, glamorous •timorous •humerus, humorous, numerous •murmurous • generous • sonorous •onerous • obstreperous • Hesperus •vaporous • viviparous • viperous •Bosporus, prosperous •stuporous • cancerous •Monoceros, rhinoceros •sorcerous • adventurous • Tartarus •nectarous • dexterous • traitorous •preposterous • slaughterous •boisterous, roisterous •uterus • adulterous • stertorous •cadaverous • feverous •carnivorous, herbivorous, insectivorous, omnivorous •Lazarus

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