storm

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storm / stôrm/ • n. 1. a violent disturbance of the atmosphere with strong winds and usually rain, thunder, lightning, or snow. ∎  (also storm system) an intense low-pressure weather system; a cyclone. ∎  a wind of force 10 on the Beaufort scale (48–55 knots or 55-63 mph). ∎  a heavy discharge of missiles or blows: two men were taken by a storm of bullets. 2. [usu. in sing.] a tumultuous reaction; an uproar or controversy: the book caused a storm in South America she has been at the center of a storm concerning payments. ∎  a violent or noisy outburst of a specified feeling or reaction: the disclosure raised a storm of protest. 3. (storms) storm windows. 4. a direct assault by troops on a fortified place. • v. 1. [intr.] move angrily or forcefully in a specified direction: she burst into tears and stormed off he stormed out of the house. ∎  [with direct speech] shout (something) angrily; rage: “Don't patronize me!” she stormed. ∎  move forcefully and decisively to a specified position in a game or contest: he barged past and stormed to the checkered flag. 2. [tr.] (of troops) suddenly attack and capture (a building or other place) by means of force: Indian commandos stormed a hijacked plane early today | [as n.] (storming) the storming of the Bastille. 3. [intr.] (of the weather) be violent, with strong winds and usually rain, thunder, lightning, or snow: when it stormed in the day, I shoveled the drive before Harry came home. PHRASES: the calm (or lull) before the storm a period of unusual tranquility or stability that seems likely to presage difficult times. storm and stressanother term for Sturm und Drang. a storm in a teacupBritish term for a tempest in a teapot (see tempest). take something by storm (of troops) capture a place by a sudden and violent attack. ∎  have great and rapid success in a particular place or with a particular group of people: his first collection took the fashion world by storm. —— up a storm perform the specified action with great enthusiasm and energy: the band could really play up a storm.DERIVATIVES: storm·proof / -ˌproōf/ adj.

Storm

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Storm

A storm is any disturbance in the atmosphere that has noticeable effects on Earths surface. The term suggests disagreeable weather conditions that may bring discomfort, inconvenience, economic disaster and loss of human lives. In spite of that fact, storms have a generally positive effect on the environment and on human societies because they are the source of most of the rain and snow on which the planet depends.

Among the many kinds of storms that exist are thunderstorms, hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards, and ice and hail storms. As different as these types of

storms may be, they possess a few common characteristics. They all result from significant atmospheric instabilities, and they all involve dramatic convection currents in which air masses travel upwards at high rates of speed.

The formation of a thunderstorm is typical of the way many storms develop. Imagine that a large mass of air encounters conditions that force it to move upwards. An approaching front or some kind of geographical barrier might produce such an effect. The air mass will continue to rise as long as it is warmer than the atmosphere around it. The upward movement of such an air mass constitutes a convection current.

At some point, moisture within the air mass may begin to condense, releasing heat as it does so. When this happens the convection current may begin to move even more rapidly. The upward movement of air in a thunder cloud has been measured at more than 50 mph (80 km/h). As the upward movement of air continues, more moisture condenses out of the air mass and a large cloud begins to form. Depending on atmospheric conditions, a thundercloud of this type may rise to a height of anywhere from 6-9 mi (10-15 km). Eventually, ice crystals within the thundercloud will begin to condense as rain, snow, or some other form of precipitation and a thunderstorm will occur.

Some of the most severe types of storms (tornadoes and hurricanes, for example) occur when the upward convention current receives a rotational push. This push converts a purely vertical air movement into a spiraling motion characteristic of these great tropical and mid-latitude storms.

See also Air masses and fronts; Cyclone and anticyclone; Tornado.

Storm

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Storm

A storm is any disturbance in the atmosphere that has noticeable effects on the earth's surface. The term suggests disagreeable weather conditions that may bring discomfort, inconvenience, economic disaster and loss of human lives. In spite of that fact, storms have a generally positive effect on the environment and on human societies because they are the source of most of the rain and snow on which the planet depends.

Among the many kinds of storms that exist are thunderstorms, hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards, and ice and hail storms. As different as these types of storms may be, they possess a few common characteristics. They all result from significant atmospheric instabilities, and they all involve dramatic convection currents in which air masses travel upwards at high rates of speed.

The formation of a thunderstorm is typical of the way many storms develop. Imagine that a large mass of air encounters conditions that force it to move upwards. An approaching front or some kind of geographical barrier might produce such an effect. The air mass will continue to rise as long as it is warmer than the atmosphere around it. The upward movement of such an air mass constitutes a convection current.

At some point, moisture within the air mass may begin to condense, releasing heat as it does so. When this happens the convection current may begin to move even more rapidly. The upward movement of air in a thunder cloud has been measured at more than 50 MPH (80 km/h). As the upward movement of air continues, more moisture condenses out of the air mass and a large cloud begins to form. Depending on atmospheric conditions, a thundercloud of this type may rise to a height of anywhere from 6-9 mi (10-15 km). Eventually, ice crystals within the thundercloud will begin to condense as rain, snow, or some other form of precipitation and a thunderstorm will occur.

Some of the most severe types of storms (tornadoes and hurricanes, for example) occur when the upward convention current receives a rotational push. This push converts a purely vertical air movement into a spiraling motion characteristic of these great tropical and mid-latitude storms.

See also Air masses and fronts; Cyclone and anticyclone; Tornado.

storm

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storm violent disturbance of the atmosphere, fig. of affairs OE.; paroxysm, violent access XVI; (from the vb.) assault of troops on a place XVII. OE. = OS. (Du.) storm, (O)HG. sturm, ON. stormr :- Gmc. *sturmaz, prob. f. *stur-, repr. also by STIR.
Hence storm vb. be tempestuous XV; (of persons) rage XVI; make an assault (on) XVII. stormy (-Y1) late OE.

Storm

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Storm

a shower or flight of objects; a passionate outburst.

Examples : storm of applause, 1832; of arrows, 1667; of blows, 1817; of bullets, 1615; of eloquence, 1712; of fate, 1713; of galloping hoofs, 1847; of invective, 1849; of music, 1781; of prayers, 1842; of shot, 1849; of sighs, tears, or plaints, 1602; of snow, 1681; of sobs; of thoughts, 1569; of weeping, 1891; of whistlings, 1615; of words, 1693; of wrath.

Storm

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Storm ★½ 1987 (PG-13)

Uneven thriller finds college students on a camping trip who must fight for their lives when they are confronted by killer thieves. Somewhat contrived, but interesting ending to this low-budget outing. 99m/C VHS . CA David Palffy, Stan Kane, Harry Freedman, Lawrence Elion, Tom Schioler; D: David Winning; M: Amin Bhatia.

storm

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storm Common term for gales, squalls, rainstorms, or thunderstorms. It is used specifically for conditions associated with the active areas of low-pressure systems. ‘Storm-force winds’ are, by definition, strong gales or winds, with speeds exceeding 20.8 m/s.

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