Bailey, Linda 1948-

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Bailey, Linda 1948-

Personal

Born 1948, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; married; children: two daughters. Education: University of British Columbia, B.A. (English), M.A. (education).

Addresses

Home—Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. E-mail—[email protected]

Career

Writer. Presenter to schools and other organizations.

Member

Canadian Society of Children's Authors, Illustrators, and Performers, Children's Book Centre of Canada, Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, Writers' Union of Canada, Vancouver Children's Literature Roundtable.

Awards, Honors

4-Surrey Book of the Year award, 1993, and Langley Book of the Year Award, 1994, both for How Come the Best Clues Are Always in the Garbage?; Ruth Schwartz Award, Arthur E. Ellis Award for best juvenile, Crime Writers of Canada, Silver Birch Award shortlist, and Canadian Library Association Notable Canadian Fiction designation, all 1994, all for How Can I Be a Detective If I Have to Baby-sit?; Arthur Ellis Award, 1996, for How Can a Frozen Detective Stay Hot on the Trail?; Arthur Ellis Award, CLB Book-of-the-Year honor, and Manitoba Young Readers' Choice honor, all 1996, all for Who's Got Gertie?; Arthur Ellis Award, 1997, and Red Cedar Award shortlist, 1999, both for What's a Daring Detective like Me Doing in the Doghouse?; Silver Birch Award shortlist, and Our Choice selection, both 2000, and Red Cedar Award shortlist, 2002, all for How Can a Brilliant Detective Shine in the Dark?; Silver Birch Award for nonfiction, 2001, for Adventures in the Middle Ages; Great Books Award, Canadian Toy Testing Council, 2002, for The Best Figure Skater in the Whole Wide World; Atlantic Hackmatack Award for English Nonfiction, Blue Spruce Award shortlist, and Red Cedar Award shortlist, all 2003, all for Adventures with the Vikings; Child magazine Best Children's Book Award, 2003, Ontario Blue Spruce Award, CNIB Tiny Torgi Award, and University of Chicago Zena Sutherland Award, all 2004, and Saskatchewan Shining Willow Award and Georgia Picture Storybook Award, both 2005, all for Stanley's Party; Atlantic Hackmatack Award for English Nonfiction shortlist, and Red Cedar Award shortlist, both 2004, both for Adventures in Ancient Greece; Silver Birch Award shortlist, 2004, and Atlantic Hackmatack Award for English Nonfiction shortlist, 2006, both for Adventures in Ancient China; Atlantic Hackmatack Award for English Nonfiction, 2006, for Adventures in the Ice Age.

Writings

FOR CHILDREN

Petula, Who Wouldn't Take a Bath, illustrated by Jackie Snider, HarperCollins (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 1996.

Gordon Loggins and the Three Bears, illustrated by Tracy Walker, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 1997.

When Addie Was Scared, illustrated by sister, Wendy Bailey, Kids Can Press (Tonawanda, NY), 1999.

The Best Figure Skater in the Whole Wide World, illustrated by Alan Daniel and Lea Daniel, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2001.

Stanley's Party, illustrated by Bill Slavin, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2003.

Stanley's Wild Ride, illustrated by Bill Slavin, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2006.

The Farm Team, illustrated by Bill Slavin, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2006.

Goodnight, Sweet Pig, illustrated by Josee Masse, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2007.

FOR CHILDREN; "STEVIE DIAMOND" MYSTERY SERIES

How Come the Best Clues Are Always in the Garbage?, illustrated by Pat Cupples, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 1992.

How Can I Be a Detective If I Have to Baby-sit?, illustrated by Pat Cupples, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 1993.

Who's Got Gertie? And How Can We Get Her Back?, illustrated by Pat Cupples, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 1994.

How Can a Frozen Detective Stay Hot on the Trail?, illustrated by Pat Cupples, Albert Whitman (Morton Grove, IL), 1996.

What's a Daring Detective like Me Doing in the Doghouse?, illustrated by Pat Cupples, Albert Whitman (Morton Grove, IL), 1997.

How Can a Brilliant Detective Shine in the Dark?, Kids Can Press (Tonawanda, NY), 1999.

What Is a Serious Detective like Me Doing in Such a Silly Movie?, Kids Can Press (Tonawanda, NY), 2002.

Author's books have been translated into several languages, including French, Chinese, Polish, and Danish.

FOR CHILDREN; "GOOD TIMES TRAVEL AGENCY" SERIES

Adventures in Ancient Egypt, illustrated by Bill Slavin, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2000.

Adventures in the Middle Ages, illustrated by Bill Slavin, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2000.

Adventures with the Vikings, illustrated by Bill Slavin, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2001.

Adventures in Ancient Greece, illustrated by Bill Slavin, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2002.

Adventures in Ancient China, illustrated by Bill Slavin, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2003.

Adventures in the Ice Age, illustrated by Bill Slavin, Kids Can Press (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), 2004.

Adaptations

Stanley's Party and Stanley's Wild Ride were adapted for videocassette, Nutmeg Media, 2006.

Sidelights

Canadian author Linda Bailey is the creator of the "Stevie Diamond Mystery" and "Good Times Travel Agency" series for middle-grade readers. Other children's books by Bailey include Gordon Loggins and the Three Bears, The Farm Team, Goodnight, Sweet Pig, and a pair of books that focus on a rambunctious dog named Stanley. Gordon Loggins and the Three Bears, a send-up of the classic Goldilocks story that finds a boy slipping through a door in the school library bookshelf and ending up starring in the librarian's story-hour tale, was described by Quill & Quire contributor Anne Louise Mahoney as a "hilarious story [that] will be a big hit with kids who know the classic tale." Praising Josee Masse's illustrations for Goodnight, Sweet Pig, School Library Journal contributor Donna Atmur added that Bailey's tale about Hamlette, a piglet who cannot fall asleep, "would also make an excellent bedtime story for restless children." In Booklist, Ilene Cooper dubbed Stanley's Party "a well-plotted delight," and Shawn Brommer predicted in School Library Journal that Bailey's energetic pooch will make "dog lovers and party animals alike … howl with delight."

In How Come the Best Clues Are Always in the Garbage?, the first novel in the "Stevie Diamond Mystery" series, eleven-year-old Stevie and friend Jesse Kulniki set out to find out who stole the funds of Garbage Busters, an environmental group that is protesting a fastfood restaurant's excessive use of packaging. How Can I Be a Detective If I Have to Baby-sit? finds Stevie and Jesse spending a week at a British Columbian reforestation camp, where Stevie's father is working. Although the girls look forward to enjoying the great outdoors, they quickly realize that they were invited along so that

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[Image not available for copyright reasons]

they could baby-sit five-year-old Alexander, the camp cook's son. When Stevie and Jesse discover that Alexander's family is in some kind of trouble, their vacation becomes a sleuthing job.

Joseph J. Rodio, writing in Catholic Library World, noted the "humorous insights" into the adult world in Bailey's series opener, as well as her portrayal of the well-developed friendship between the two girls. Gisela Sherman, writing in Canadian Children's Literature, praised the quick-paced plot, "great dialogue, comic timing, odd clues and hilarious situations" in How Come the Best Clues Are Always in the Garbage?, adding that the novel's environmental message "fits in naturally." Calling How Can I Be a Detective If I Have to Babysit? "a cut above most detective series for the age group," School Library Journal contributor Linda Wicher described the plot as "nimble," and Booklist reviewer Chris Sherman called Bailey's story "entertaining" and its heroine "engaging," going on to predict that the novel's fast pace will appeal to young readers.

The "Stevie Diamond Mystery" series continues with Who's Got Gertie? And How Can We Get Her Back?, How Can a Frozen Detective Stay Hot on the Trail?, and What's a Daring Detective like Me Doing in the Doghouse? In Who's Got Gertie? thirteen-year-old Stevie and Jesse try to locate a missing neighbor, a retired actress, while How Can a Frozen Detective Stay Hot on the Trail? finds the sleuthing duo tracking down missing carnivorous plants in chilly Winnipeg, where one of the suspects is Stevie's uncle. Who's Got Gertie? was praised by Quill & Quire contributor Sarah Ellis, who cited Bailey's successful depiction of "middle-grade-mayhem" and described the novel as "colourful, lively, ephemeral, attention-getting, extravagant, and a crowd pleaser." Janet McNaughton, reviewing How Can a Frozen Detective Stay Hot on the Trail? for Quill & Quire, praised the author's characterization, plotting, and use of local color, and added that "the mystery works well, too."

What's a Daring Detective like Me Doing in the Doghouse? finds Stevie working at a day-care center for dogs while someone known only as the "Vancouver Prankster" causes all manner of mischief, eventually stealing the Canadian prime minister's underwear. When a stray dog appears to have a connection to the prankster, the girls investigate. Other novels include How Can a Brilliant Detective Shine in the Dark?, in which a family reunion leads to a lost treasure, a hidden cave, and maybe murder, while What Is a Serious Detective like Me Doing in Such a Silly Movie? follows the girls' experiences as part of the cast of a horror film called Night of the Neems. Reviewing the last-named title, Phelan cited Bailey's "flair for crisp dialogue," while School Library Journal contributor Tina Zubak wrote of How Can a Brilliant Detective Shine in the Dark? that "the book's humor and fast pace make it an enjoyable, old-fashioned whodunit."

Bailey begins her "Good Times Travel Agency" series with Adventures in Ancient Egypt, which introduces twins Josh and Emma Binkerton. Together with tagalong little sister Lizzy, the twins find themselves transported

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[Image not available for copyright reasons]

into the past via the pages of a magical travel guide they discover in a strange travel agency. Trapped in the year 2500 B.C., the children discover that the only way to return to their own time is to read the entire travel guide, cover to cover, and a number of interesting adventures occur while they do so. "Bailey delivers not only a fast-paced story but also a fun way to convey information" regarding her ancient setting, noted Shelley Townsend-Hudson in a Booklist review of Adventures in Ancient Egypt.

Readers are carried along on the Binkerton children's further time-travel adventures in Adventures in the Middle Ages, Adventures in Ancient Greece, Adventures in Ancient China, Adventures in the Ice Age, and Adventures with the Vikings, the last which finds the children stowed away on a Viking ship in 800 A.D. Calling the Binkertons' escapades in Adventures in Ancient Greece "as hilarious as they are exciting," Resource Links contributor Veronica Allan added that Bailey's novel blends "historical information with fictional adventure in a way that cleverly presents facts" while also "entertaining … readers." Praising "the creative pen and ink, watercolour drawings and cartoon captions of Bill Slavin" that bring each series installment "to life," Resource Links writer Gail Lennon described Adventures with the Vikings as "interesting and innovative" in its approach to teaching about ancient cultures. In Booklist, Carolyn Phelan praised the same book as a "brief, accessible introduction to the subject," while Lynda Ritterman wrote in School Library Journal that Adventures in Ancient China is "both fun and educational" due to Bailey's unique "combination of adventure story and factual material."

Biographical and Critical Sources

PERIODICALS

Booklist, March 15, 1996, Chris Sherman, review of How Can I Be a Detective If I Have to Baby-sit?, p. 1264; November 15, 1999, John Peters, review of When Addie Was Scared, p. 632; January 1, 2001, Shelley Townsend-Hudson, review of Adventures in Ancient Egypt, p. 941; October 15, 2001, Carolyn Phelan, review of Adventures with the Vikings, p. 391; November 1, 2004, Kay Weisman, review of Adventures in the Ice Age, p. 477; May 1, 2003, Carolyn Phelan, review of How Can a Brilliant Detective Shine in the Dark?, p. 1528; July, 2003, Ilene Cooper, review of Stanley's Party, p. 1895; March 1, 2006, Gillian Engberg, review of Stanley's Wild Ride, p. 98; October 1, 2006, Carolyn Phelan, review of The Farm Team, p. 56.

Books for Keeps, September, 1996, David Bennett, review of How Come the Best Clues Are Always in the Garbage, p. 13.

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, December, 1997, Deborah Stevenson, review of Gordon Loggins and the Three Bears, p. 117; October 4, 2002, review of What's a Serious Detective like Me Doing in Such a Silly Movie?; May, 2003, review of Stanley's Party, p. 350.

Canadian Book Review Annual, 1994, p. 545; 2004, Christine Linge Macdonald, review of Adventures in the Ice Age, p. 544.

Canadian Children's Literature, winter, 1994, Gisela Sherman, review of How Come the Best Clues Are Always in the Garbage?, p. 66.

Canadian Review of Materials, March, 1994, p. 44; February 15, 2003, review of Adventures in Ancient Egypt; March 28, 2003, review of Stanley's Party.

Catholic Library World, December, 1996, Joseph J. Rodio, review of How Come the Best Clues Are Always in the Garbage?, p. 55.

Children's Book Review Service, spring, 1996, p. 141.

Emergency Librarian, September, 1994, p. 56.

Kirkus Reviews, September 15, 2006, review of The Farm Team, p. 946.

Publishers Weekly, February 3, 2003, review of Stanley's Party, p. 74; March 5, 2007, review of Goodnight, Sweet Pig, p. 59.

Quill & Quire, August, 1992, p. 26; December, 1994, Sarah Ellis, review of Who's Got Gertie?, p. 31; September, 1996, Janet McNaughton, review of How Can a Frozen Detective Stay Hot on the Trail?, and Joan Findon, review of How Come the Best Clues Are Always in the Garbage?, both p. 74; July, 1997, Anne Louise Mahoney, review of Gordon Loggins and the Three Bears, p. 51; September, 2001, review of The Best Figure Skater in the Whole Wide World, p. 52.

Resource Links, December, 1999, review of When Addie Was Scared, p. 2; February, 2000, review of How Can a Brilliant Detective Shine in the Dark?, p. 7; December, 2000, review of Adventures in Ancient Egypt, pp. 10-11; October, 2001, Gail Lennon, review of Adventures with the Vikings, p. 22; December, 2001, Valerie Pollock, review of The Best Figure Skater in the Whole Wide World, p. 2; December, 2002, Veronica Allan, review of Adventures in Ancient Greece, p. 36; June, 2003, Isobel Lang, review of Stanley's Party, p. 1; October, 2003, Greg Bak, review of Adventures in Ancient China, p. 12; June, 2006, Denise Parrott, review of Stanley's Wild Ride, p. 2; February, 2007, Evette Berry, review of The Farm Team, p. 1; June, 2007, Tanya Boudreau, review of Goodnight, Sweet Pig, p. 1.

School Library Journal, May, 1996, p. 110; July, 1996, Linda Wicher, review of How Can I Be a Detective If I Have to Baby-sit?, p. 82; December, 2001, Rita Soltan, review of The Best Figure Skater in the Whole Wide World, p. 88; June, 2003, Tina Zubak, review of How Can a Brilliant Detective Shine in the Dark?, p. 136; July, 2003, Shawn Brommer, review of Stanley's Party, p. 87, and Tina Zubak, review of What's a Serious Detective like Me Doing in Such a Silly Movie?, p. 123; January, 2004, Lynda Ritterman, review of Adventures in Ancient China, p. 110; June, 2006, Suzanne Myers Harold, review of Stanley's Wild Ride, p. 98; November, 2006, Blair Christolon, review of The Farm Team, p. 84; June, 2007, Donna Atmur, review of Goodnight, Sweet Pig, p. 92.

Times Educational Supplement, July 5, 1996, review of How Come the Best Clues Are Always in the Garbage?, p. R8.

ONLINE

Canadian Society of Children's Authors, Illustrators, and Performers Web site,http://www.canscaip.org/ (April 1, 2006), "Linda Bailey."