Martin, Waldo E., Jr. 1951–

Updated About encyclopedia.com content Print Article Share Article
views updated

Martin, Waldo E., Jr. 1951–

PERSONAL: Born 1951. Education: Duke University, B.A.; University of California, Berkeley, Ph.D.

ADDRESSES: Office—Department of History, University of California, Berkeley, 3229 Dwinelle Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-2550. E-mail[email protected]

CAREER: University of California, Berkeley, professor of history. Distinguished Lecturer, Organization of American Historians, 2005–06.

MEMBER: Organization of American Historians.

WRITINGS:

NONFICTION

The Mind of Frederick Douglass, University of North Carolina Press (Chapel Hill, NC), 1984.

(Editor) Brown v. Board of Education: A Brief History with Documents, Bedford/St. Martin's Press (Boston, MA), 1998.

(Editor, with Patricia A. Sullivan) Civil Rights in the United States, Macmillan Reference USA (New York, NY), 2000.

No Coward Soldiers: Black Cultural Politics and Postwar America, Harvard University Press (Cambridge, MA), 2005.

Contributor to Making America: The Society and Culture of the United States, edited by Luther S. Luedtke, University of North Carolina Press (Chapel Hill, NC), 1992; and Struggles in the Promised Land: Toward a History of Black-Jewish Relations in the United States, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 1997.

WORK IN PROGRESS: A book on the culture of the civil rights-Black Power movement.

SIDELIGHTS: Waldo E. Martin, Jr., is an educator whose research and writing covers many aspects of modern social movements and especially the civil rights movement. His book No Coward Soldiers: Black Cultural Politics and Postwar America was developed from a series of lectures the author delivered at Harvard University, and focuses on the civil rights and Black Power movements in American history, covering the period from 1945 to 1975. During this time, the author contends, there was a profound shift in the way African Americans looked at themselves, and this shift was reflected particularly in the music of the era. Library Journal reviewer Thomas J. Davis noted that Martin's treatment of this "pivotal" subject matter includes links to other important writers about the African-American experience.

Civil Rights in the United States, a reference book coedited by Martin, is relevant to the social struggles of not only African Americans, but also women, prisoners, the disabled and other groups. School Library Journal reviewer Dana McDougald called it a "clearly written, accessible" resource, and Library Journal contributor Anthony O. Edmonds deemed Civil Rights in the United States "a very important reference work because of its enormous reach; it should be in all sizable academic and public libraries."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Booklist, August, 2000, review of Civil Rights in the United States, p. 2195.

Library Journal, September 1, 2000, Anthony O. Edmonds, review of Civil Rights in the United States, p. 192; March 1, 2005, Thomas J. Davis, review of No Coward Soldiers: Black Cultural Politics and Postwar America, p. 98.

School Library Journal, November, 2000, Dana McDougald, review of Civil Rights in the United States, p. 94.

ONLINE

Organization of American Historians Web site, http://www.oah.org/ (September 27, 2005), personal information about Waldo E. Martin, Jr.

University of California, Berkeley Web site, http://history.berkeley.edu/ (September 27, 2005), personal information about Waldo E. Martin, Jr.

More From Encyclopedia.com


You Might Also Like