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Mansfield, Edward D. 1962–

Mansfield, Edward D. 1962–

PERSONAL:

Born October 22, 1962. Education: University of Pennsylvania, B.A. (cum laude), 1984, M.A., 1986, Ph.D., 1989.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Department of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania, 223 Stiteler Hall, 208 S. 37th St., Philadelphia, PA 19104. E-mail—[email protected]; [email protected]

CAREER:

Political scientist, educator, writer, and editor. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, teaching assistant, 1986-88, instructor, 1989, assistant professor of political science, 1989-94, visiting lecturer, 1992-93, Hum Rosen Professor of Political Science and director of the Christopher H. Browne Center for International Politics, 2001—; Columbia University, New York, NY, associate professor of political science, 1994-96; Ohio State University, Columbus, professor of political science, 2000-01.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Susan Louise Dyer Peace Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University, 1998-99; Karl W. Deutsch Award in International Relations and Peace Research, International Studies Association, 2000; awarded fellowships, including University of Pennsylvania, 1989, and a fellowship from Columbia University's Council on Research and Faculty Development in the Humanities and Social Science, 1990-91. Also recipient of research grants.

WRITINGS:

Power, Trade, and War, Princeton University Press (Princeton, NJ), 1994.

(Editor, with Friedrich Kratochwil) International Organization: A Reader, HarperCollins College Publishers (New York, NY), 1994.

(Editor, with Helen V. Milner) The Political Economy of Regionalism, Columbia University Press (New York, NY), 1997.

(Editor, with Jean-Marc F. Blanchard and Norrin M. Ripsman) Power and the Purse: Economic Statecraft, Interdependence, and National Security, F. Cass (Portland, OR), 2000.

(Editor, with Brian M. Pollins) Economic Interdependence and International Conflict: New Perspectives on an Enduring Debate, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 2003.

(Editor) International Conflict and the Global Economy, Edward Elgar (Northampton, MA), 2004.

(Editor, with Richard Sisson) The Evolution of Political Knowledge: Theory and Inquiry in American Politics, Ohio State University Press (Columbus, OH), 2004.

(With Jack Snyder) Electing to Fight: Why Emerging Democracies Go to War, MIT Press (Cambridge, MA), 2005.

(Editor, with Friedrich Kratochwil) International Organization and Global Governance: A Reader, 2nd edition, Pearson/Longman (New York, NY), 2006.

(Editor, with Marc L. Bush) The WTO, Economic Interdependence, and Conflict, Edward Elgar (Northampton, MA), 2007.

Contributor to books, including Regional Integration and the Global Trading System, edited by Kym Anderson and Richard Blackhurst, editors, Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1993; Perspectives on American Foreign Policy: Readings and Cases, edited by Bruce W. Jentleson, W.W. Norton, 2000; International Political Economy: Perspectives on Global Power and Wealth, 4th edition, edited by A. Frieden and David A. Lake, Bedford/St. Martin's, 2000; Routledge Encyclopedia of International Political Economy, edited by R.J. Barry Jones, Routledge, 2001; Turbulent Peace: The Challenges of Managing International Conflict, edited by Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson, and Pamela Aall, Institute of Peace Press, 2001; Models, Numbers, and Cases: Methods for Studying International Relations, edited by Detlef F. Sprinz and Yael Wolinsky-Nahmias, University of Michigan Press, 2004; and The Impact of International Law on International Cooperation: Theoretical Perspectives, edited by Eyal Benvenisti and Moshe Hirsch, Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Contributor to periodicals, including the International Journal of Technology Management, Security Studies, International Review of Sociology, American Political Science Review, International Organization, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Hoover Digest, International Studies Quarterly, British Journal of Political Science, and Comparative Political Studies. Served as editorial board member of Helvidius, 1995-96; Political Research Quarterly, 1996-2000; American Journal of Political Science, 1998-2002; World Politics, 1998-2004; International Organization, 2000—; and American Political Science Review, 2001—. Also coeditor of "Michigan Studies in International Political Economy" series, 1994—, and general editor of Columbia International Affairs Online Curriculum Modules, 2000—.

SIDELIGHTS:

Edward D. Mansfield is a political scientist and writer whose research focuses on international security and international political economy. He has written and edited numerous books in his field. In his first book, Power, Trade, and War, the author presents one of the first attempts to model the relationships among the distribution of power, international trade, and war. Writing in the book's introduction, the author notes: "The specific questions in this study have a long and rich tradition in the field of international relations. To what extent does the distribution of power influence the onset of war and patterns of international trade? If variations in the distribution of power account for patterns of war and trade, is it possible to explain why these variations occur? Do patterns of international trade help to explain the conditions under which war begins; and is the effect of trade more or less salient than that of the distribution of power in this regard? To what extent does war impact patterns of international trade? Are political factors more or less important detriments of war and commerce than economic factors?"

The author begins his book with a basic empirical analysis of the distribution of wars over time and then analyzes the distribution of power and the onset of war. Next he looks at international trade and the onset of war and the effects of power and war on trade. He ends with a discussion of the determinants and dynamics of the concentration of power as it affects war. He also provides a general discussion of his conclusions. Jeffrey A. Hart wrote in the American Political Science Review that the author "should be praised for the care and skill he demonstrates in dealing with a wide variety of theories, data sets, and statistical methods," adding later in the same review that "for graduate students about to undertake their own empirical quests, it would be hard to find a better exemplar." Political Science Quarterly contributor Marie Anchordoguy noted: "Mansfield is to be commended for going beyond most systemic studies by including process-level factors, such as the level of international trade and the business cycle in his analysis."

The Political Economy of Regionalism, edited by Mansfield and Helen V. Milner, presents a series of essays that analyze regionalism from a political economy perspective. In the book's overview, Mansfield and Miller note: "The advent of the North American Free Trade Agreement, the ongoing process of economic integration in Europe, the formation of Mercosur, and the possibility of a new Asia-Pacific economic bloc have led to lively and widespread debates concerning the causes and effects of regionalism. Many of these debates center on the economic implications of regionalism, a topic on which a large and rich literature exists." They added: "Others revolve around the effect of political factors on regional blocks and the influence of these blocks on the tenor of international and domestic politics. Yet very little recent research has been conducted on the political economy of regionalism. The purpose of this volume is to address this important topic."

The Political Economy of Regionalism received several favorable reviews. "The dearth of theoretically inspired approaches to new regionalism makes it likely that the Mansfield and Milner volume will become a widely used and cited book," wrote Wil Hout in the Australian Journal of Political Science. David M. Andrews commented in the Political Science Quarterly: "The essays collected by Edward Mansfield and Helen Milner usefully address recent developments while revisiting and sometimes revising earlier studies of regionalism's economic, monetary, and security dimensions."

Mansfield is also the editor, with Brian M. Pollins, of Economic Interdependence and International Conflict: New Perspectives on an Enduring Debate. In their book, Mansfield and Pollins present a collection of essays focusing on the critical question of the relationship between economic interdependence and conflict among states. Writing in the book's introduction, Mansfield and Pollins note that "there has been a surge of interest in the relationship between economic interdependence and political conflict. One view that has gained considerable popularity and empirical support is that heightened interdependence fosters cooperative political relations." The editors go on to note later: "Nonetheless, critics of this argument have not been stilled. Some observers maintain that, rather than fostering cooperation, increased interdependence generates political discord. Even more widespread is the argument that economic exchange has no strong bearing on the high politics of national security."

Many of the essays in the book explore the belief that open trade promotes peace and clarify the current knowledge about the effects of foreign commerce on political-military relations. Contributors also write about new avenues of research to provide new insights into this relationship. The author contributes an essay titled "Preferential Peace: Why Preferential Trading Agreements Inhibit Interstate Conflict."

"Only rarely does one encounter such a clearly focused edited volume with consistently well-written and thought-provoking contributions," wrote Peter Liberman in the International Studies Review. "Particularly exciting were the efforts in the book to theorize systematically and precisely about the causal mechanisms linking interdependence to conflict, particularly when accompanied by empirical tests, as in the chapters on joint democracy and preferential trading arrangements."

Mansfield is the author, with Jack Snyder, of the 2005 book titled Electing to Fight: Why Emerging Democracies Go to War. According to Parameters contributor Bradley L. Bowman, the authors "provide a necessary ‘reality check’ for the misguided view that the promotion of democracy invariably represents a prudent policy for the United States." In their book, the authors recount how successive U.S. administrations have justified various policies focusing on promoting democracy with the arguments that democracies are inherently good and that democratic countries rarely go to war with each other, as shown by research. The authors, however, argue against many interventionist policies by the United States, especially those that have sought to influence local governments by removing undemocratic regimes through political pressure, economic sanctions, and military force. The authors point out that, in fact, states in the early phases of becoming democratic are more likely than other states to go to war.

Writing in the book's preface, Mansfield and Snyder note: "America's efforts to promote democracy around the globe have all too often been fraught with danger and disappointment. In this book, we seek to explain why. By exploring when and why democratization can lead to war, we seek to understand when—and how—the spread of democracy might be encouraged while avoiding the increased risk of war."

Using both qualitative and quantitative analysis, the authors point to patterns of cases where burgeoning democracies have gone to war, from revolutionary France to contemporary Russia. They go on to argue that the high risk of violent conflict until democracy is fully established in these countries means that another approach is necessary. They write that the best way to promote democracy is begin by building the institutions that democracy requires and then encouraging mass political participation and elections.

"Electing to Fight is much more than just another forceful argument; this book is a comprehensive scholarly study with critical implications for American policy," wrote Bowman in Parameters. "In short, the character of Mansfield and Snyder's scholarship and the relevance of their conclusions make Electing to Fight one of the most important books written in recent years."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

BOOKS

Mansfield, Edward D., Power, Trade, and War, Princeton University Press (Princeton, NJ), 1994.

Mansfield, Edward D., and Helen V. Milner, editors, The Political Economy of Regionalism, Columbia University Press (New York, NY), 1997.

Mansfield, Edward D., and Brian M. Pollins, Economic Interdependence and International Conflict: New Perspectives on an Enduring Debate, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 2003.

Mansfield, Edward D., and Jack Snyder, Electing to Fight: Why Emerging Democracies Go to War, MIT Press (Cambridge, MA), 2005.

PERIODICALS

American Political Science Review, March 1, 1995, Jeffrey A. Hart, review of Power, Trade, and War, p. 258.

Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, May 1, 1995, Janice E. Thomson, review of Power, Trade, and War, p. 184.

Australian Journal of Political Science, July 1, 1998, Wil Hout, review of The Political Economy of Regionalism, p. 302.

Choice, July-August, 1994, D. Kowalewski, review of Power, Trade, and War; December 1, 2004, A.L. Warber, review of The Evolution of Political Knowledge: Theory and Inquiry in American Politics, p. 729; June 1, 2006, P.F. Diehl, review of Electing to Fight, p. 1899.

Economic Journal, May 1, 1995, Ron Smith, review of Power, Trade, and War, p. 747.

Foreign Affairs, May-June, 2004, G. John Ikenberry, review of Economic Interdependence and International Conflict, p. 138.

International Affairs, October 1, 1994, Lisa Martin, review of Power, Trade, and War, p. 772.

International Journal, September 22, 1997, review of The Political Economy of Regionalism, p. 733.

International Organization, January 1, 1996, Theodore H. Moran, review of Power, Trade, and War, p. 175.

International Studies Quarterly, April 1, 1995, James A. Caporaso, review of Power, Trade, and War, p. 117; November 1, 1998, Bruce E. Moon, review of The Political Economy of Regionalism, p. 338.

International Studies Review, spring, 2004, Peter Liberman, "Trade and Peace," review of Economic Interdependence and International Conflict, pp. 139-141.

Journal of Democracy, April 1, 2007, Michael McFaul, "Are New Democracies War-Prone?," review of Electing to Fight, p. 161.

Journal of Economic Literature, September 1, 1994, review of Power, Trade, and War, p. 1321; March 1, 1995, Benjamin J. Cohen, review of Power, Trade, and War, p. 237; December 1, 2003, review of Economic Interdependence and InternationalConflict, p. 1343; March 1, 2005, review of International Conflict and the Global Economy, p. 241.

Journal of Peace Research, November 1, 1994, Tore Myhre, review of International Organization: A Reader, p. 466; November 1, 2003, Gerald Schneider, review of Economic Interdependence and International Conflict, p. 751; July 1, 2006, Kristian Skrede Gleditsch, review of Electing to Fight, p. 498.

Parameters, December 22, 2007, Bradley L. Bowman, review of Electing to Fight, p. 124.

Political Science Quarterly, March 22, 1995, Marie Anchordoguy, review of Power, Trade, and War, p. 148; March 22, 1998, David M. Andrews, review of The Political Economy of Regionalism, p. 137; December 22, 2006, Bruce Russett, review of Electing to Fight, p. 701.

Prairie Schooner, March 22, 1995, review of Power, Trade, and War, p. 148; March 22, 1998, review of The Political Economy of Regionalism, p. 137.

Reference & Research Book News, February 1, 2005, review of International Conflict and the Global Economy, p. 122.

ONLINE

University of Pennsylvania Christopher H. Browne Center for International Politics Web site,http://www.ssc.upenn.edu/centers/brownecip/ (April 18, 2008), faculty profile.

University of Pennsylvania Web site,http://www.polisci.upenn.edu/ (April 18, 2008), faculty profile.

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