Hyland, Peter 1943-

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Hyland, Peter 1943-

PERSONAL: Born September 21, 1943, in Huddersfield, England; son of John (a shoemaker) and Edith (Hinchcliffe) Hyland; married Theresa Dececchi (a teacher), October, 1972; children: Brendan, Robert. Education: University of Wales, B.A., 1964, diploma of education, 1965; McMaster University, M.A., 1969, Ph.D., 1973. Politics: Socialist Religion: "Atheist."

ADDRESSES: Home—27 Rockford Crescent, London, Ontario N6K 3B5, Canada. Office—Huron University College, 1349 Western Rd., London, Ontario N6G 1H3, Canada. E-mail[email protected]

CAREER: University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran, British Council visiting professor, 1973-75; Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, British Council visiting professor, 1975-80; National University of Singapore, senior lecturer, 1981-87; University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, senior fellow at Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 1987-88; Huron University College, London, Ontario, professor, 1988-.

AWARDS, HONORS: Grant from Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, 1989-90.

WRITINGS:

CRITICISM

Disguise and Role Playing in Ben Jonson's Drama, Salzburg University Press (Salzburg, Austria), 1977.

(Editor) Discharging the Canon: Cross-Cultural Readings in Literature, Singapore University Press (Singapore), 1986.

Shakespeare: Troilus and Cressida, Penguin Books (Harmondsworth, England), 1989.

Saul Bellow, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1992.

An Introduction to Shakespeare: The Dramatist in His Context, St. Martin's Press (New York, NY), 1996.

An Introduction to Shakespeare's Poems, Palgrave Macmillan (New York, NY), 2003.

Author of six books on cross-cultural experience written specifically for Japanese university students. Contributor to books. Contributor of more than eighty articles and reviews to periodicals.

WORK IN PROGRESS: Disguise on the Early English Stage, for Ashgate Publishing (Burlington, VT).

SIDELIGHTS: Peter Hyland told CA: "Although my career, both as teacher and writer, has been in the academic world, I have tried to avoid orthodoxy and compartmentalization. I believe that the only way for the world to survive will be through the breaking down of barriers and divisions between cultures. Thus a large part of my career has involved the teaching of Western culture in Asia, and even though I am now settled in Canada, I have developed strong ties with a number of Chinese universities. Part of my current work involves the teaching of Asian culture to Western students."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Notes and Queries, December, 1993, David Seed, review of Saul Bellow, p. 573; March, 1998, Martin Coyle, review of An Introduction to Shakespeare: The Dramatist in His Context, p. 117.