Goldfield, David (R.) 1944-

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GOLDFIELD, David (R.) 1944-

PERSONAL: Born July 18, 1944, in Memphis, TN; son of Alexander (a musician) and Sarah (a teacher; maiden name, Goldberg) Goldfield; married Marie-Louise Hedin (an artist), December 13, 1980; children: Erik, Eleanor. Education: University of Maryland, Ph. D., 1970. Hobbies and other interests: Classical and country music, reading southern novels, softball.


ADDRESSES: Home—719 Jefferson Dr., Charlotte, NC 28270. Offıce—Department of History, University of North Carolina—Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223; fax: 704-687-2184. Agent—Geri Thoma, Elaine Markson Literary Agency, Inc., 44 Greenwich Ave., New York, NY 10011. E-mail—[email protected]


CAREER: University of North Carolina—Charlotte, Robert Lee Bailey Professor of History, 1982—. Museum of the New South, vice president.


MEMBER: American Historical Association, Organization of American Historians (distinguished lecturer), Urban Affairs Association, Urban History Association (president), American Studies Association, Southern Historical Association.


AWARDS, HONORS: Two Mayflower Awards for nonfiction; appointed to Fulbright Distinguished Chair in American Studies.


WRITINGS:

Cotton Fields and Skyscrapers: Southern City andRegion, 1607-1980, Louisiana State University Press (Baton Rouge, LA), 1982.

(Editor, with John H. Franklin and Abraham S. Eisenstadt) Promised Land: The South since 1945, Harlan Davidson (Arlington Heights, IL), 1987.

Black, White, and Southern: Race Relations andSouthern Culture, 1940 to the Present, Louisiana State University Press (Baton Rouge, LA), 1990.

(Editor, with Paul D. Escott) The South for NewSoutherners, University of North Carolina Press (Chapel Hill, NC), 1991.

Region, Race, and Cities: Interpreting the Urban South (essays), Louisiana State University Press (Baton Rouge, LA), 1997.

(Coauthor) The American Journey (textbook), Prentice-Hall (Englewood Cliffs, NJ), 1998.

Still Fighting the Civil War: The American South andSouthern History, Louisiana State University Press (Baton Rouge, LA), 2002.


Editor in chief, Journal of Urban History.

WORK IN PROGRESS: Rebirth of a Nation: The United States from 1850 to 1900.


SIDELIGHTS: David Goldfield told CA: "I want to bring history alive for the general reading public. Too often historians communicate only among themselves. While the study of history for history's sake may attract some people, I'm more interested in connecting history with what's going on today—in how we can use history to understand the present and help map the future.


"I get many of my topics from just looking around me at the issues, the events, and the concerns of Americans. So, for example, my book Still Fighting the Civil War: The American South and Southern History received its inspiration from the conflicts in the 1990s over the Confederate battle flag, the rise of neo-Confederate groups, the contests over the entrance of women into southern military institutions, the trials of individuals who murdered civil rights leaders, and the growing debate of how southern history should be represented on the landscape and in museums.


"My research project, Rebirth of a Nation: The United States from 1850 to 1900, derives from my interest in our values as a society, especially as we confront the war on terrorism, and how we have reconciled our ideals with the reality of racism, labor conflict, and the role of women in our society, and how we have not. The period from 1850 to 1900 was a time of tremendous technological, economic, political, and social change. In many respects, we are what and who we are today because of what happened during that half-century and, in order to understand ourselves better today, I am looking at how, why, and what occurred during this period."


BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

America, May 12, 1990, Patrick H. Samway, review of Black, White, and Southern: Race Relations and Southern Culture, 1940 to the Present, p. 481.

American Historical Review, December, 1983, review of Cotton Fields and Skyscrapers: Southern City and Region, 1607-1980, p. 1314; October, 1991, Nancy J. Weiss, review of Black, White, and Southern, p. 1300.

Antioch Review, fall, 1990, Barbara L. Green, review of Black, White, and Southern, p. 537.

Business History Review, autumn, 1984, Diane Lindstrom, review of Cotton Fields and Skyscrapers, p. 451; autumn, 1990, Numan V. Bartley, review of Black, White, and Southern, p. 539.

Chronicle of Higher Education, May 16, 1990, Ellen K. Coughlin, review of Black, White, and Southern, p. A14.

Journal of American Ethnic History, spring, 1993, H. V. Nelson, review of Black, White, and Southern, p. 87.

Journal of American History, June, 1983, James M. Russell, review of Cotton Fields and Skyscrapers, p. 108; March, 1991, Charles W. Eagles, review of Black, White, and Southern, p. 1405.

Journal of Southern History, May, 1988, Martin V. Melosi, review of Promised Land: The South since 1945, p. 364; November, 1991, Fitzhugh Brundage, review of Black, White, and Southern, p. 764; May, 1994, Stephen A. Smith, review of The South for New Southerners, p. 441; November, 2001, Glenn T. Eskew, review of Region, Race, and Cities: Interpreting the Urban South, p. 911.

Library Journal, February 1, 1990, Thomas J. Davis, review of Black, White, and Southern, p. 94; February 1, 2002, Robert K. Flatley, review of Still Fighting the Civil War: The American South and Southern History, p. 114.

Publishers Weekly, December 22, 1989, Genevieve Stuttaford, review of Black, White, and Southern, p. 52; February 11, 2002, review of Still Fighting the Civil War, p. 173.

Society, November-December, 1990, David M. Willems, review of Black, White, and Southern, p. 88.

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