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Foster, Alan Dean 1946-

Foster, Alan Dean 1946-

PERSONAL:

Born November 18, 1946, in New York, NY; son of Maxwell Feinberg (a salesperson) and Helen Foster; married JoAnn Oxley, July 5, 1975. Education: University of California, Los Angeles, B.A., 1968, M.F. A., 1969. Politics: "Adaptable." Religion: Jewish. Hobbies and other interests: Basketball, backpacking, classical and hard rock music, world travel, weight lifting, hiking, body surfing, scuba diving, collecting first-edition science-fiction work and art.

ADDRESSES:

Home—Prescott, AZ. Agent—(fiction) Virginia Kidd, P.O. Box 278, Milford, PA 18337; (scripts) Ilse Lahn, 5300 Fulton, Van Nuys, CA 91401. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Writer. Headlines Ink Agency (public relations firm), Studio City, CA, head copywriter, 1970-71; Los Angeles City College, Los Angeles, CA, instructor in motion picture writing and history, 1971-76; University of California, Los Angeles, CA, instructor in English and film, c. 1970s; Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, adjunct faculty member, 1991—. City of Prescott (AZ) Planning and Zoning Commission, vice chairperson, 1986-87. Military service: U.S. Army Reserve, 1969-75.

MEMBER:

Authors Guild, Authors League of America, Science Fiction Writers of America, Writers Guild of America—West.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Galaxy Award, 1979, for Splinter of the Mind's Eye: From the Adventures of Luke Skywalker; Southwest Book Award for Fiction, 1990, for Cyber Way; Ignotus Award for best work of short fiction in a language other than Spanish, 1995, for novella "La nuestra senor de la maqina"; Russian language Strannik Award, 1999, and Aelita Award, 2005, both for body of work.

WRITINGS:

SCIENCE FICTION NOVELS

The Man Who Used the Universe, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1983.

The I Inside, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1984.

Slipt, Berkley Publishing (New York, NY), 1984.

Shadowkeep, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1984.

Into the Out Of, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1986.

Glory Lane, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1987.

Malendipity, Berkley Publishing, 1987.

To the Vanishing Point, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Quozl, Ace Books (New York, NY), 1989.

Cyber Way, Ace Books (New York, NY), 1990.

Cat-a-Lyst, Ace Books (New York, NY), 1991.

Codgerspace, Ace Books (New York, NY), 1992.

Chorus Skating, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1994.

Greenthieves, Ace Books (New York, NY), 1994.

(With Elia Barceló and Gustavo Santos) Premio UPC 1993 (short fiction), Ediciones Barcelona (Barcelona, Spain), 1994.

(With Eric Frank Russell) Design for Great-Day, Tor Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Life-Form, Ace Books (New York, NY), 1995.

The Dig (based on a story by Sean Clark), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Dinotopia Lost, Turner (Atlanta, GA), 1996.

Mad Amos, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1996.

(With James C. Christensen and Renwick St. James) Voyage of the Basset, Artisan (New York, NY), 1996.

Jed the Dead, Ace Books (New York, NY), 1997.

Parallelities, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1998.

The Hand of Dinotopia, illustrated by James Gurney, HarperCollins (New York, NY), 1999.

Into the Thinking Kingdoms, Aspect (New York, NY), 1999.

A Triumph of Souls, Aspect/Warner Books (New York, NY), 2000.

(Coauthor) Inner Visions: The Art of Ron Walotsky, Paper Tiger (Kerhonkson, NY), 2000.

Kingdoms of Light, Warner Books (New York, NY), 2001.

Interlopers, Ace Books (New York, NY), 2001.

The Mocking Program, Warner Books (New York, NY), 2002.

The Chronicles of Riddick, Ballantine Books (New York, NY), 2004.

Sagramanda: A Novel of Near-future India, Pyr (Amherst, NY), 2006.

"COMMONWEALTH" SERIES; SCIENCE FICTION NOVELS

The Tar-Aiym Krang, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1972.

Bloodhype, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1973.

Icerigger (first book in "Icerigger" trilogy), Ballantine (New York, NY), 1974.

Midworld, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1975.

Orphan Star (sequel to The Tar-Aiym Krang), Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1977.

The End of the Matter (sequel to Orphan Star), Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1977.

Mission to Moulokin (second book in "Icerigger" trilogy), Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1979.

Cachalot, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1980.

Nor Crystal Tears, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1982.

Flinx of the Commonwealth, three volumes, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1982.

For Love of Mother-Not, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1983.

Voyage to the City of the Dead, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1984.

Sentenced to Prism, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1985.

The Deluge Drivers (third book in "Icerigger" trilogy), Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1987.

Flinx in Flux, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Mid-Flinx, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1995.

The Howling Stones: A Novel of the Commonwealth, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1997.

Reunion: A Pip & Flinx Novel, Ballantine (New York, NY), 2001.

Drowning World: A Novel of the Commonwealth, Del Rey (New York, NY), 2003.

Flinx's Folly: A Pip & Flinx Novel, Ballantine Books (New York, NY), 2003.

Sliding Scales: A Pip & Flinx Novel, Del Rey (New York, NY), 2004.

Running from the Deity, Del Rey/Ballantine (New York, NY), 2005.

Trouble Magnet: A Pip & Flinx Adventure, Del Rey/Ballantine Books (New York, NY), 2006.

"FOUNDING OF THE COMMONWEALTH" SERIES

Phylogenesis, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1999.

Dirge, Ballantine (New York, NY), 2000.

Diuturnity's Dawn, Del Rey (New York, NY), 2002.

"SPELLSINGER" SERIES; FANTASY NOVELS

Spellsinger (also see below), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1981.

Spellsinger at the Gate (contains Spellsinger and The Hour of the Gate), Phantasia Press (Huntington Woods, MI), 1983.

The Hour of the Gate, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1984.

The Day of the Dissonance, Phantasia Press (Huntington Woods, MI), 1984.

The Moment of the Magician, Phantasia Press (Huntington Woods, MI), 1984.

Season of the Spellsong (contains Spellsinger, The Hour of the Gate, and The Day of the Dissonance), Doubleday (New York, NY), 1984.

The Paths of the Perambulator, Phantasia Press (Huntington Woods, MI), 1985.

The Time of the Transference, Phantasia Press (Huntington Woods, MI), 1986.

Spellsinger's Scherzo (contains The Moment of the Magician, The Paths of the Perambulator, and The Time of the Transference), Doubleday, 1987.

Son of Spellsinger, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1993.

Chorus Skating, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1994.

"JOURNEYS OF THE CATHECHIST" SERIES

Carnivores of Light and Darkness, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1998.

Into the Thinking Kingdoms, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1999.

A Triumph of Souls, Warner Books (New York, NY), 2000.

"STAR TREK" SERIES

Star Trek Log One, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1974.

Star Trek Log Two, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1974.

Star Trek Log Three, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1975.

Star Trek Log Four, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1975.

Star Trek Log Five, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1975.

Star Trek Log Six, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1976.

Star Trek Log Seven, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1976.

Star Trek Log Eight, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1976.

Star Trek Log Nine, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1977.

With Friends like These … (collection), Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1977.

Star Trek Log Ten, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1978.

Who Needs Enemies? (collection), Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1984.

The Metrognome and Other Stories (collection), Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1990.

Star Trek Logs One, Two, and Three, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1992.

Star Trek Logs Four, Five, and Six, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1993.

Star Trek Logs Seven, Eight, and Nine, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1993.

Montezuma's Strip (stories), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Star Trek, the Animated Series, Del Rey/Ballantine (New York, NY), 2006.

"THE DAMNED" SERIES

A Call to Arms, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1991.

The False Mirror, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1992.

The Spoils of War, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1993.

"TAKEN" TRILOGY

Lost and Found: A Novel, Del Rey (New York, NY), 2004.

The Light-years beneath My Feet, Del Rey/Ballantine Books (New York, NY), 2005.

The Candle of Distant Earth, Del Rey (New York, NY), 2006.

NOVELIZATIONS

Luana (based on the screenplay by Louis Road), Ballantine (New York, NY), 1974.

Dark Star (based on the screenplay of the same title by Dan O'Bannon and John Carpenter), Ballantine (New York, NY), 1974.

Star Wars: From the Adventures of Luke Skywalker (based on the screenplay of the same title by George Lucas), Ballantine (New York, NY), 1976.

Splinter of the Mind's Eye: From the Adventures of Luke Skywalker, Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1978.

Star Trek—The Motion Picture (based on the screenplay of the same title by Harold Livingston), Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1979.

Alien (based on the screenplay of the same title by Dan O'Bannon), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1979.

The Black Hole (based on the screenplay of the same title by Jeb Rosenbrook and Gerry Day), Del Rey Books (New York, NY), 1980.

Clash of the Titans (based on the screenplay of the same title by Beverly Cross), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1981.

Outland (based on the screenplay of the same title by Peter Hyams), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1981.

The Thing (based on the screenplay of the same title by Bill Lancaster), Bantam (New York, NY), 1982.

Krull: A Novel (based on the screenplay of the same title by Stanford Sherman), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1983.

The Last Starfighter (based on the screenplay of the same title by Jonathan Betuel), Berkley Publishing, 1984.

Starman (based on the screenplay of the same title by Ray Gideon, Bruce Evans, and Dean Riesner), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1984.

Pale Rider (based on the screenplay of the same title by Michael Butler and Dennis Shryack), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1985.

Aliens (based on the screenplay of the same title by James Cameron), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1986.

Alien Nation (based on the screenplay of the same title by Rockne S. O'Bannon), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1988.

Alien 3, Warner Books (New York, NY), 1991.

The Complete Alien Omnibus (contains Alien, Aliens, and Alien 3), Warner Books (New York, NY), 1993.

Star Wars, the Approaching Storm, Ballantine Books (New York, NY), 2002.

Transformers (based on the screenplay of the same title by Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman), Del Rey (New York, NY), 2007.

OTHER

Horror on the Beach: A Tale in the Cthulhu Mythos, Valcour and Krueger (San Diego, CA), 1978.

(Editor) Animated Features and Silly Symphonies, Abbeville Press (New York, NY), 1980.

(Editor) The Best of Eric Frank Russell, 2nd edition, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1986.

Maori (historical novel), Berkley Publishing (New York, NY), 1988.

(Editor, with Martin H. Greenberg) Smart Dragons, Foolish Elves, Ace Books (New York, NY), 1991.

(Editor) Betcha Can't Read Just One, Ace Books (New York, NY), 1993.

Sir Charles Barkley and the Referee Murders (graphic novel), Hamilton Comics (Prescott, AZ), 1993.

Primal Shadows (suspense), Forge (New York, NY), 2001.

Contributor to anthologies, including Fellowship of the Stars; Nine Science Fiction Stories, edited by Terry Carr, Simon & Schuster, 1974; and The Mutant Files, edited by Martin H. Greenberg and John Helfers, DAW, 2001.

Author of radio scripts in "Episodes in American History" series for station KFIR, Oregon, including The Age of Ice, Mystery of the North, Before Watts, Flip Wilson Did Not Discover America, But …, First into Space, Goodyear, Cream Cheese, and Rubber, The Monitor Was a Swede, The Battle We Almost Lost, and The Iroquois Confederacy. Media columnist for magazines Rigel, 1981-83, and Science Fiction Review, 1991—. Contributor of short stories to magazines, including Adam, Analog, Arkham Collector, Coq, Fantasy Book, Galaxy, Galileo, Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, and Worlds of If.

Foster's work has been translated into nearly every major language. His correspondence and manuscripts are housed in the Hayden Library, Arizona State University.

SIDELIGHTS:

Alan Dean Foster is best known for his science fiction novels about the Humanx Commonwealth, a future confederation of planets settled by both humans and the insect-creatures known as the Thranx. "In the tradition of Edgar Rice Burroughs," according to John I. Lawson in the St. James Guide to Science Fiction Writers, "Foster creates exotic worlds, peopling them with strange and fascinating races and with memorable characters, using them as a backdrop against which he weaves his tales. His plausible, scientifically sound settings combined with vivid, sensual descriptions make Foster's worlds come alive." In addition to his novels concerning the Humanx Commonwealth, and other science fiction tales, Foster has written in the fantasy, horror, and detective genres. Furthermore, he has written the novelizations for such popular films as Star Wars, Alien, and The Black Hole, and for the "Star Trek" animated cartoon series, and authored the story for Star Trek: The Motion Picture, the first of the film versions of the popular television series. Two of his books, Alien and The Black Hole, have each sold over one million copies. In all, more than ten million copies of Foster's works are in print.

Foster began his writing career unexpectedly in 1968 when August Derleth, editor of the Arkham Collector, a magazine about the works of horror author H.P. Lovecraft, bought a letter Foster had sent to the magazine and published it as a short story. This initial publication spurred the young author to further writing, and Foster was soon publishing stories in a variety of science fiction and fantasy magazines. In 1972 his first novel, The Tar-Aiym Krang, was published by Ballantine.

The Tar-Aiym Krang was the first of Foster's books to concern the Humanx Commonwealth, a future interplanetary alliance between humans and the Thranx insect-creatures. This commonwealth of planets provides the backdrop for many of Foster's books, such as Cachalot and The Howling Stones: A Novel of the Commonwealth, and gives the author the opportunity to create a wide variety of unique worlds. The novel Cachalot, for example, is set on Cachalot, an ocean planet where humans live in floating cities. Icerigger is set on Tranky-ky, an ice world, while the novel Midworld is set on a jungle planet. Several of the "Commonwealth" novels focus on a super-intelligent space traveler named Philip "Flinx" Lynx, who searches the galaxy for a clue to his parentage. Reunion: A Pip & Flinx Novel, a 2001 novel that finds Flinx battling a genetically enhanced nemesis during his perpetual search, is a space opera that a Publishers Weekly contributor maintained would be "a surefire, if comfortably predictable, reading experience."

The telepathic Flinx, along with his sidekick flying snake or minidragon, Pip, are featured in numerous tales in the "Commonwealth" series. Flinx's Folly: A Pip & Flinx Novel is "brisk, lightweight SF entertainment," according to a Publishers Weekly contributor. Here Flinx discovers that the dreams he is having of some huge malevolence approaching the Commonwealth are shared by others. There is, in fact, a threat to all civilization. Turning to his former lover Clarity Held to discuss these contagious dreams, Flinx is caught up in a love triangle between Clarity and her new boyfriend. Further praise came from Booklist contributor Regina Schroeder, who found Flinx's Folly to be "a fast, light, adventurous afternoon read."

Flinx returns in Running from the Deity, in which he is taken for a god-like person by the inhabitants of a distant planet, where he lands his spaceship for repairs. Discovering Flinx's telepathic powers, these aliens pursue him as a healer. Booklist writer Schroeder found this "another entertaining addition to the world of Pip and Flinx." With Sliding Scales: A Pip & Flinx Novel, Flinx decides to vacation on a remote planet contested by the Commonwealth and the warlike Aann empire. There he nearly falls victim the evil machinations of a local guide who would be king. His dreams of a peaceful vacation are definitely put on hold. "Flinx comes out of the experience not exactly rested, but certainly wiser," commented Schroeder in Booklist. Reviewing the same work in Library Journal, Jackie Cassada praised the "appealing heroes and fast-paced plotting." Likewise, Sandy Freund, writing in School Library Journal, found Sliding Scales "an entertaining, imaginative adventure with a likable protagonist."

In The Trouble Magnet: A Pip & Flinx Adventure Flinx must find a miraculous weapon to defeat a challenger to the Commonwealth. His task is complicated, however, by self doubts and his searches into his identity. Cassada, writing in Library Journal, observed that this installment in the series offers "more of the nonstop action series fans have come to expect."

Foster has also written numerous "Commonwealth" books that do not feature Flinx. In Drowning World: A Novel of the Commonwealth, the Commonwealth is again threatened by their archrivals, the bellicose and reptilian Aann. A Kirkus Reviews critic described this installment as a "Cold War-style superpower confrontation-by-proxy, tricked out in weird-alien garb: no prizes for style, but satisfyingly substantial." A Publishers Weekly contributor also lauded the effort, noting that Drowning World "offers the kind of sure-fire entertainment that keeps his fans coming back for more."

Foster examines the birth of the Commonwealth and the origins of the allegiance between Thranx and humans in his "Founding of the Commonwealth" trilogy, whose final installment, Diuturnity's Dawn, is an "engrossing drama," according to Booklist writer Roberta Johnson. A Publishers Weekly reviewer thought the same novel was "eminently readable," while adding a cautionary note that "it rambles on," particularly in its physiological descriptions.

In addition to using exotic locales, Foster creates believable characters, both alien and human. A Publishers Weekly critic noted that the author "domesticates an incredible plot through the creation of commonplace heroes." Foster once explained: "I tend to write about ordinary people confronted with extraordinary circumstances. [Science fiction magazine editor] John W. Campbell once told me that ‘it's hard for a reader to sympathize with superman,’ advice I've never forgot- ten. And I see no dichotomy in my love for ‘jest plain folks’ and the outer world of science fiction. I expect it's apparent in my choice of favorite book, Conan Doyle's The Lost World, or my favorite films, Gunga Din, The Thief of Baghdad (1939 version), and Bambi. Readers say I seem particularly sympathetic to the alien viewpoint in my stories, but then, I've always felt something of an outsider. I consider myself living in primitive, barbaric times, but times of great promise."

A recurring trait in Foster's many novels is a light and humorous tone. A Publishers Weekly critic claimed that "reading Foster is like eating a meringue: it's not very filling, but it tastes just fine." In Quozl, for example, Foster tells of an alien race named the Quozls who come to Earth and settle in the remote mountains of Idaho. When they are eventually discovered by a young boy, the Quozls—who look cute, furry and harmless—become the object of a media marketing campaign which includes stuffed animal toys, Hollywood films, and Saturday cartoon shows. Their overwhelming popularity as cute objects to sell saves the Quozls from hostility and allows the aliens to stay safely on Earth. A reviewer for Science Fiction Chronicle found Quozl to be "a successful blend of mild satire, humor, and first contact story."

Another of Foster's humorous novels is Cat-a-Lyst, in which two aliens disguised as housecats come to Earth. One of them wants to monitor human progress, while the other is determined to upset it. Their mission is interrupted by the arrival of Incas from a parallel dimension and by the efforts of Jason Carter, an actor interested in locating a lost treasure. "What starts as a light hearted adventure story," wrote a critic for Science Fiction Chronicle, "moves quickly into high farce." A reviewer for Library Journal called Cat-a-Lyst "an affectionate tribute to bad sf films."

Foster turns to a more serious premise in Cyber Way, the story of a Tampa detective tracking down the killer of a wealthy businessman. The man's expensive Navajo sand painting—a part of his collection of Native American art—was deliberately destroyed during the crime, making the mystery even more puzzling. In Cyber Way Foster presents a "fascinating amalgam of sf/detective fiction and Native American lore," Library Journal critic Jackie Cassada reported. Roland Green, writing in Booklist, asserted that the novel's "social extrapolation and characterizations are superior."

The prolific novelist has also published the popular "Journeys of the Catechist" trilogy, including Carnivores of Light and Darkness, Into the Thinking Kingdoms, and A Triumph of Souls. The series revolves around desert herdsman Etjole Ehombe, who is asked by a dying stranger to save the Visioness Themaryl from the hands of the evil sorcerer, Hymneth the Possessed. Critics were enthusiastic in their response to the series. Carnivores of Light and Darkness is "top-drawer Foster," concluded a Publishers Weekly critic in a review of the first novel of the trilogy. Booklist critic Roberta Johnson lauded the second book in the trilogy, Into the Thinking Kingdoms, as "Foster at his best, thoughtful and fun." The final installment, A Triumph of Souls, also fared well with critics. A Publishers Weekly reviewer wrote that the "engaging" situations and characters are "far more complex than they first appear." Jackie Cassada concluded in Library Journal that A Triumph of Souls is a "fitting end to a distinctive picaresque saga."

Kingdoms of Light revolves around the Gowdlands, a civilized nation taken over by the sorcerer Khaxan Mundurucu, who places a spell on the Gowdlands, removing all color from their world. The novel, which is not part of a series, was warmly received by critics. "Humor and wit enliven this quest-tale," wrote Jackie Cassada in Library Journal. A Publishers Weekly critic expected that fans of "swift-moving plots and imaginative settings will overlook the thin characters and enjoy this pleasant fantasy tale."

Foster delivered another trilogy of works with Lost and Found, The Light-Years beneath My Feet, and The Candle of Distant Earth,. The "Taken" trilogy, as it is called, deals with the adventures of a group of individuals abducted by aliens and their attempts to find their way back home. Lost and Found is about Chicago commodities trader Marcus Walker, who is abducted by purple aliens while on a camping vacation in California. He finds himself taken into deep space, accompanied by a talking dog named George. Other extraterrestrials have also been abducted so that they can be sold as curiosities to high-rolling aliens. Booklist critic Carl Hays felt that Foster "doles out enough wit, suspense, and original alien anthropology to keep readers spellbound from chapter one on." The trilogy continues with The Light-years beneath My Feet, in which Walker and friends are rescued for a time by the inhabitants of Sessrimathe, but soon they continue their attempts to return to their own worlds. Booklist writer Hays also had praise for this second installment in the trilogy, observing that "Foster is in top form here, entertainingly mixing politics, comedy, and intriguing alien anthropology." Library Journal critic Cassada similarly found the same book "sometimes humorous, sometimes serious, and always entertaining." The trilogy concludes with The Candle of Distant Earth, which is a "rousing finish," according to Booklist reviewer Hays. Here, Walker and his fellow abductees make their final bid to return to their home planets. Hays praised the "skillful blend of amusing cultural misunderstandings and edge-of-the-seat suspense" in this "most entertaining" of all of Foster's series.

Foster has also produced novels that blend science fiction with mystery and suspense, including The Mocking Program and Sagramanda: A Novel of Near-Future India Booklist contributor David Pitt had singular praise for the former title: "Peppered with clever new technology and offbeat characters, the book successfully crosses genres." Reviewing Sagramanda in Library Journal, Cassada found it a "polished hybrid of page-turning action and taut suspense." A Publishers Weekly reviewer also commended Sagramanda as an "unpredictable thriller, whose multiple threads Foster juggles like the professional he is."

Foster once told CA: "There are several reasons why I write primarily science fiction. You see, science fiction is the only branch of contemporary literature which cares about and deals with what's going to happen tomorrow. That's vitally important to all of us in these days when tomorrow seems to jump out at us, not some time next century, but on the news every night and in the headlines every morning.

"It is also the only genre with absolutely no restrictions. The writer of speculative fiction can do anything, absolutely anything he or she wants. The only convention is that there are no conventions. Science fiction doesn't attract writers: it seduces them. Total creative freedom is very seductive. My last reason is personal. I love to travel, love to explore new places, meet new people, encounter new cultures. Most of us are restricted to one small, unspectacular planet. Those of us who write science fiction are not."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

BOOKS

St. James Guide to Science Fiction Writers, 4th edition, Thomson Gale (Detroit, MI), 1995.

Teague, Robert, and Michael Goodwin, A Guide to the Commonwealth: The Official Guide to Alan Dean Foster's Humanx Commonwealth Universe, Galagraphics, 1985.

PERIODICALS

Analog, December 15, 1989, Tom Easton, review of Quozl, p. 181; July 1, 1995, Tom Easton, review of Greenthieves, p. 307; February 1, 1996, Tom Easton, review of Life Form, p. 159; November 1, 1996, Tom Easton, review of Dinotopia Lost, p. 145; June 1, 1997, Tom Easton, review of Jed the Dead, p. 145; September, 1997, Tom Easton, review of The Howling Stones: A Novel of the Commonwealth, p. 150; January, 1999, Tom Easton, review of Carnivores of Light and Darkness, p. 130.

Booklist, May 1, 1990, Roland Green, review of Cyber Way, p. 1688; January 15, 1995, Carl Hays, review of Design for Great-Day, p. 900; November 1, 1995, Carl Hays, review of Mid-Flinx, p. 458; February 1, 1996, review of Dinotopia Lost; March 15, 1999, Roberta Johnson, review of Into the Thinking Kingdoms, p. 1293; May 1, 1999, Chris Sherman, review of The Hand of Dinotopia, p. 1587; May 15, 1999, Roberta Johnson, review of Phylogenesis, p. 1676; February 1, 2000, Roland Green, review of A Triumph of Souls, p. 1010; April 15, 2000, Roberta Johnson, review of Dirge, p. 1530; March 15, 2002, Roberta Johnson, review of Diuturnity's Dawn, p. 1218; July 1, 2002, David Pitt, review of The Mocking Program, p. 1825; December 1, 2002, Regina Schroeder, review of Drowning World: A Novel of the Commonwealth, p. 651; October 1, 2003, Regina Schroeder, review of Flinx's Folly: A Pip & Flinx Adventure, p. 307; June 1, 2004, Carl Hays, review of Lost and Found, p. 1712; April 15, 2005, Carl Hays, review of The Light-years beneath My Feet, p. 1443; August 1, 2005, Regina Schroeder, review of Running from the Deity, p. 2008; April 15, 2006, Carl Hays, review of The Candle of Distant Earth, p. 33; October 15, 2006, Regina Schroeder, review of Trouble Magnet: A Pip & Flinx Adventure, p. 36.

Chronicle, July 1, 2005, Don D'Ammassa, review of The Light-years beneath My Feet, p. 33.

Entertainment Weekly, October 27, 2006, Polly Shulman, "From Bradbury to Teddy Bear Sleuths," p. 75.

Internet Bookwatch, February 1, 2007, review of Sagramanda: A Novel of Near-Future India.

Kirkus Reviews, February 15, 1993, review of The Spoils of War: Book Three of the Damned, p. 189; November 15, 1994, review of Design for Great-day, p. 1500; December 1, 2000, review of Kingdoms of Light, p. 1652; November 1, 2002, review of Drowning World, p. 1577; September 1, 2003, review of Flinx's Folly, p. 1106; July 1, 2005, review of Running from the Deity, p. 713; February 15, 2006, review of The Candle of Distant Earth, p. 165; September 15, 2006, review of Trouble Magnet, p. 933.

Kliatt, March 1, 2003, Sherry S. Hoy, review of The Hand of Dinotopia, p. 32.

Library Journal, October 15, 1986, Jackie Cassada, review of Into the Out Of, p. 112; May 15, 1990, Jackie Cassada, review of Cyber Way, p. 99; June 15, 1991, review of review of Cat-a-Lyst, p. 109; February 15, 1992, Jackie Cassada, review of The False Mirror: Book Two of the Damned, p. 200; April 15, 1993, Jackie Cassada, review of The Spoils of War, p. 130; November 15, 1995, review of The Dig, p. 105; February 15, 1997, Susan Hamburger, review of The Howling Stones, p. 164; May 15, 1998, Jackie Cassada, review of Carnivores of Light and Darkness, p. 118; March 15, 1999, Jackie Cassada, review of Into the Thinking Kingdoms, p. 113; June 15, 1999, Jackie Cassada, review of Phylogenesis, p. 112; March 15, 2000, Jackie Cassada, review of A Triumph of Souls, p. 132; April 15, 2000, Jackie Cassada, review of Dirge, p. 126; January 1, 2001, Jackie Cassada, review of Kingdoms of Light, p. 163; August, 2001, 171; June 1, 2002, Devon Thomas, review of The Mocking Program, p. 194; February 15, 2003, review of Drowning World, p. 173; June 15, 2004, Jackie Cassada, review of Lost and Found, p. 65; October 15, 2004, Jackie Cassada, review of Sliding Scales: A Pip & Flinx Adventure, p. 58; May 15, 2005, Jackie Cassada, review of The Light-years beneath My Feet, p. 111; September 15, 2006, Jackie Cassada, review of Sagramanda, p. 54; November 15, 2006, Jackie Cassada, review of Trouble Magnet, p. 62.

Los Angeles Times, September 18, 1983, Kristiana Gregory, review of The Man Who Used the Universe, p. 8.

Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, August 1, 1982, Algis Budrys, review of The Thing, p. 26; August 1, 1996, Charles de Lint, review of Mad Amos, p. 29.

New York Times Book Review, August 20, 1989, Gerald Jonas, review of Quozl, p. 24.

Publishers Weekly, July 10, 1987, review of Glory Lane, p. 64; July 24, 1987, review of Into the Out Of, p. 183; July 1, 1988, review of To the Vanishing Point, p. 70; March 24, 1989, review of Quozl, p. 63; April 20, 1990, review of Cyber Way, p. 69; May 31, 1991, review of Cat-a-Lyst, p. 68; February 3, 1992, review of The False Mirror, p. 67; March 15, 1993, review of The Spoils of War, p. 73; January 16, 1995, review of Design for a Great Day, pp. 443-444; October 16, 1995, review of Mid-Flinx, p. 47; October 30, 1995, review of The Dig, p. 48; January 22, 1996, review of Dinotopia Lost, p. 60; January 27, 1997, review of The Howling Stones, p. 81; May 11, 1998, review of Carnivores of Light and Darkness, p. 55; March 8, 1999, review of Into the Thinking Kingdoms, p. 52; May 10, 1999, review of Phylogenesis, p. 62; March 6, 2000, review of A Triumph of Souls, p. 88; May 29, 2000, review of Dirge, p. 56; January 22, 2001, review of Kingdoms of Light, p. 307; April 16, 2001, review of Reunion, p. 49; July 23, 2001, review of The Mutant Files, p. 56; February 18, 2002, review of Diuturnity's Dawn, p. 80; July 1, 2002, review of The Mocking Program, p. 59; December 9, 2002, review of Drowning World, p. 67; September 8, 2003, review of Flinx's Folly, p. 60; August 23, 2004, review of Sliding Scales, p. 41; May 23, 2005, review of The Light-years beneath My Feet, p. 63; May 8, 2006, review of The Candle of Distant Earth, p. 51; August 21, 2006, review of Sagramunda, p. 54; September 4, 2006, review of Trouble Magnet, p. 43.

Reviewer's Bookwatch, August 1, 2004, S.A. Gorden, review of The Chronicles of Riddick; March 1, 2005, S.A. Gorden, review of The Mocking Program.

School Library Journal, September 1, 1991, John Lawson, review of A Call to Arms, p. 292; January, 1998, review of The Howling Stones, p. 139; March 1, 2005, Sandy Freund, review of Sliding Scales, p. 243; January 1, 2006, Erin Dennington, review of The Light-years beneath My Feet, p. 172.

Science Fiction Chronicle, March, 1989, review of Quozl, pp. 37, 40; May, 1991, review of Cat-a-Lyst, p. 35.

Science Fiction Studies, November 1, 1993, review of The Thing, p. 394.

Voice of Youth Advocates, October 1, 1984, review of Slipt, p. 206; October 1, 1992, review of Codgerspace, p. 238; December 1, 1993, review of The Spoils of War, p. 309; June 1, 1996, review of Mid-Flinx, p. 107; August 1, 1996, review of Dinotopia Lost, p. 168; April 1, 1997, review of Jed the Dead, p. 42; April 1, 1997, review of Mid-Flinx, p. 11; February 1, 1999, review of Parallelities, p. 442; April 1, 1999, review of Parallelities, p. 13; August 1, 2002, review of The Approaching Storm, p. 201; June 1, 2003, review of Drowning World, p. 122; April 1, 2005, Timothy Capehart, review of Lost and Found, p. 54; October 1, 2005, Michael Levy, review of Future Histories, p. 292.

ONLINE

Alan Dean Foster Home Page,http://www.alandeanfoster.com (April 30, 2007).

Internet Writing Journal,http://www.writerswrite.com/ (April 30, 2007), Claire E. White, "A Conversation with Alan Dean Foster."

Mostly Fiction,http://www.mostlyfiction.com/ (August 26, 2002), Cindy Lynn Speer, review of The Mocking Program.

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