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Bradshaw, Anne C. 1942–

Bradshaw, Anne C. 1942–

PERSONAL: Born February 7, 1942, in Caernarvon, Wales; daughter of Frederick (a company manager) and Eva (a homemaker; maiden name, Barclay) Tozer; married Robert Bradshaw (a city manager), September 10, 1966; children: David, Linda Bradshaw Van Orden, Jeff, Peter. Politics: Conservative Religion: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon).

ADDRESSES: Agent—c/o Cedar Fort, 925 North Main St., Springville, UT 84663. E-mail[email protected]

CAREER: Writer.

WRITINGS:

Terracotta Summer (novel), Cedar Fort (Springville, UT), 2000.

Chamomile Winter (novel), Cedar Fort (Springville, UT), 2002.

(With others) LDStorymakers: Publishing Secrets, LDStorymakers (Orem, UT), 2004.

Contributor to New Era.

WORK IN PROGRESS: A young-adult novel; coauthoring a book of essays by writers who are also mothers; coauthoring Stories from the Heart (juvenile short stories), publication by Mapletree Publishing expected in 2005.

SIDELIGHTS: Anne C. Bradshaw told CA: "Writing is something I've wanted to do since school days, and tried on and off many times during years of work, marriage, children, and house and country moves. Contributing to the youth magazine New Era for over fifteen years finally made me serious about novel writing. My primary motive is to entertain, intrigue, and inform.

"I initially took a correspondence course that allowed me to learn at my own pace. I found it well worth the cost. In addition, I have never stopped reading articles and books on writing—always discovering or remembering things I should be doing or avoiding. I've kept a box of ideas and jottings for a long time, knowing that one day they'd get into a book. My favorite way to begin a story is to stick four sheets of paper together and plot out family members' lives and what I want to happen in each chapter. Then I dive in and write, and enjoy the way events move in new directions. I write and rewrite.

"Gerald Lund's One in Thine Hand is one of my favorite stories, and the author has influenced my work to some extent. This particular novel is set in modern Israel, and I learned much about that war-torn land and about its people and our differences—a powerful story. I write the way I like to read: plenty of action, dialogue, and nothing boring.

"I wanted my novels, Terracotta Summer and its sequel Chamomile Winter, to be edifying on the subject of abuse, and at the same time demonstrate in a non-preaching way how easy it is for young people to be misled and misunderstood.

"Before writing full time, I never realized just how much discipline it takes to sit still for hours on end at the keyboard. I also have been surprised at how many times a manuscript needs revising—and still find things that could be improved long after publication. The whole process of learning how to write takes much longer than most readers realize. I learn and relearn on a regular basis.

"From the books I have written so far, my favorite is the one I've just finished. Its working title is "Mack Novak and the Gaddy Antons." I love writing for the young-adult genre and enjoy the satisfaction of creating mystery and suspense—fun to research and fun to write. I've learned more as a writer—after some fifteen years practice—on this book than any previous work.

"I hope my books bring enjoyment, fresh knowledge, and surprise to readers, leaving them glad they bothered, and eager to read more."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Library Journal, February 1, 2002, Melanie C. Duncan, review of Chamomile Winter, p. 78.

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