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Boyle, Elizabeth

Boyle, Elizabeth

PERSONAL:

Married Terry Boyle; children: two sons. Hobbies and other interests: Reading, traveling, knitting, gardening, preparing low-fat recipes.

ADDRESSES:

Home—Seattle, WA. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Writer. Has worked as a paralegal.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Dell Diamond Debut Award, Dell Publishing, 1996, for Brazen Angel; RITA Award and Best Long Historical Novel from Romance Writ- ers of America, Best First Historical Romance from Romantic Times Online, Heart of Romance Reader's Choice Award for Best Historical Romance nomination, and RomCom Reviewer's Choice Award and Reader's Choice Award, 1997, all for Brazen Angel; Best Regency Historical Romance nomination from Romantic Times Online, and National Reader's Choice Award finalist for best short historical fiction, both 1999, both for Brazen Temptress; Best Historical Love and Laughter Award, Romantic Times Online, 2000, for No Marriage of Convenience; Romantic Times Online Top Picks for Brazen Heiress, Brazen Temptress, No Marriage of Convenience, and Once Tempted.

WRITINGS:

Brazen Angel, Dell (New York, NY), 1997.

Brazen Heiress, Dell (New York, NY), 1998.

Brazen Temptress, Dell (New York, NY), 1999.

No Marriage of Convenience, Avon Books (New York, NY), 2000.

Once Tempted, Avon Books (New York, NY), 2001.

One Night of Passion, Avon Books (New York, NY), 2002.

Stealing the Bride, Avon Books (New York, NY), 2003.

It Takes a Hero, Avon Books (New York, NY), 2004.

Something about Emmaline, Avon Books (New York, NY), 2005.

This Rake of Mine, Avon Books (New York, NY), 2005.

(With Stephanie Laurens and Christina Dodd) Hero, Come Back, Avon Books (New York, NY), 2005.

His Mistress by Morning, Avon (New York, NY), 2006.

SIDELIGHTS:

Elizabeth Boyle's novels combine romance, adventure, and history. Her first book, Brazen Angel, was published after winning the Dell Diamond Debut Award, and then went on to win honors for the year's best debut novel from the Romance Writers of America. Before establishing her writing career, Boyle worked as a paralegal. Her job involved working on fraud and police misconduct cases, providing her with interesting background information for some of her novels.

The Dell Diamond Debut Contest guarantees a publishing contract for the author of the winning manuscript. When Boyle found out she was a finalist, she was elated, but she also faced a daunting challenge. The judges had read her first chapters; she was supposed to have the complete manuscript ready to give to them, but she had not yet finished it when she was informed she was a finalist. Boyle raced to finish her book in time to meet the deadline, and her husband bought her a crucial thirty-six extra hours by flying from Seattle to New York City to personally deliver the manuscript to the contest.

This Rake of Mine features a typical Regency romance story line. The heroine, Miranda Mabberly, finds her honor called into question when she is publicly kissed by Lord John Tremont, notorious for his womanizing. Sent away in disgrace, she takes on a new name and starts a new life as an instructor at a ladies' finishing school. After several years, Lord John arrives at the school to enroll his niece there. He fails to recognize Miranda from the past, but falls in love with her. Harriet Klausner, reviewing the book for Best Reviews, called it a "fine historical pot boiler" with an "admirable heroine."

Numerous reviewers found Boyle in top form with her book Something about Emmaline. In this novel, Emmaline Denford is a wily con artist who takes on the identity of Baroness Sedgwick, wife of Alexander Denford, the Baron of Sedgwick. Emmaline's bold move surprises Alexander, who had created the identity of the Baroness in order to meet demands that he marry, even though he really preferred to go on leading a quiet, sheltered life on his own. Alexander agrees to go along with Emmaline's ruse, and finds himself in love with her as well. Reviewing the novel in Best Reviews, Suan Wilson called it "a clever and original story with a twist at the end that will surprise and tickle readers. Ms. Boyle delivers with a wild and outrageous tale."

His Mistress by Morning blends romance with the paranormal, in a story involving a magic ring that will grant one wish. As she goes to sleep wearing the ring, Charlotte Wilmont wishes that she were the woman loved by Sebastian Marlowe, a local nobleman. Her wish is granted, but in an unexpected way. Sebastian does not fall in love with Charlotte, nor does Charlotte take on the identity of Sebastian's fiancee, Lavinia Burke. Instead, Charlotte awakes to find herself in the body of a courtesan in London who is, in fact, Sebastian's true love. Boyle's depiction of Charlotte's struggle to adapt to her new identity is "nothing short of brilliant," according to John Charles in Booklist.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Booklist, December 15, 1998, Ann Bouricius, review of Brazen Heiress, p. 729; June 1, 2003, John Charles, review of Stealing the Bride, p. 1751; February 1, 2005, John Charles, review of Something about Emmaline, p. 948; September 15, 2005, John Charles, review of This Rake of Mine, p. 42; August 1, 2006, John Charles, review of His Mistress by Morning, p. 54.

Publishers Weekly, May 24, 1999, review of Brazen Temptress, p. 75; June 11, 2001, review of Once Tempted, p. 68; June 3, 2002, review of One Night of Passion, p. 71; June 9, 2003, review of Stealing the Bride, p. 41; April 25, 2005, review of Hero, Come Back, p. 44.

ONLINE

All about Romance,http://www.likesbooks.com/ (December 3, 2002), Kate Smith, review of Brazen Heiress, Blythe Barnhill, review of Brazen Temptress, Kelly Parker, review of No Marriage of Convenience, and Sandy Coleman, review of One Night of Passion.

Best Reviews,http://thebestreviews.com/ (March 10, 2004), Suan Wilson, review of It Takes a Hero; (March 15, 2004), Harriet Klausner, review of It Takes a Hero; (January 10, 2005), Harriet Klausner, Something about Emmaline; (January 14, 2005), Suan Wilson, review of Something about Emmaline; (May 28, 2005), Harriet Klausner, review of The Matchmaker's Bargain; (October 15, 2005), Harriet Klausner, review of This Rake of Mine.

BookBrowser,http://www.bookbrowser.com/ (April 22, 1999), Harriet Klausner, reviews of Brazen Temptress, Once Tempted, No Marriage of Convenience, and One Night of Passion.

Crescent Blues,http://www.crescentblues.com/ (March 22, 2007), Doris Valliant, review of No Marriage of Convenience.

Elizabeth Boyle's Home Page,http://www.elizabethboyle.com (March 21, 2007).

Passionate Pen,http://www.passionatepen.com/ (March 21, 2007), interview with Elizabeth Boyle.

Romance and Friends,http://www.romanceandfriends.com/ (November, 2000), Lea Moyer, review of No Marriage of Convenience.

Romance Journal,http://www.romancejournal.com/ (December, 1998), "In the Spotlight."

Romance Reader,http://www.theromancereader.com/ (January 9, 1999), Judith Flavell, review of Brazen Heiress; (July 10, 1999), Lesley Dunlap, review of Brazen Temptress; (June 29, 2001), Meredith McGuire, review of Once Tempted; (October 3, 2004), Jean Mason, review of No Marriage of Convenience, and Judy McKee, review of One Night of Passion.

Romance Review,http://www.aromancereview.com/ (March 21, 2007), interview with Elizabeth Boyle.

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