Mascheroni, Edoardo

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Mascheroni, Edoardo

Mascheroni, Edoardo, distinguished Italian conductor; b. Milan, Sept. 4, 1852; d. Ghirla, near Varese, March 4, 1941. As a boy, he showed special interest in mathematics and literature. He wrote literary essays for the journal La Vita Nuova before he decided to study music seriously, at which time he took lessons with Boucheron in Milan and composed various pieces. In 1880 he began a career in Brescia as a conductor, and it was in that capacity that he distinguished himself. He was first a theater conductor in Livorno; then went to Rome, where he established his reputation as an opera conductor at the Teatro Apollo (1884). From 1891 to 1894 he was chief conductor of Milan’s La Scala, where Verdi chose him to conduct the premiere of his Falstaff (Feb. 9, 1893). After conducting in Germany, Spain, and South America, he continued his career in Italy until retiring about 1925. He wrote 2 operas, Lorenza (Rome, April 13, 1901) and La Perugina (Naples, April 24, 1909), 2 Requiems, and chamber music. His brother, Angelo Mascheroni (1855–95), was also a conductor.

—Nicolas Slonimsky/Laura Kuhn/Dennis McIntire