Joan I of Navarre (1273–1305)

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Joan I of Navarre (1273–1305)

Queen of France and Navarre. Name variations: Jeanne I of Navarre or Jeanne de Navarre; Joan of Champagne and Navarre; Joan of Navarre; Joan de Blois; Jeanne I, countess of Champagne; Juana I, queen of Navarre. Reigned as queen of Navarre (r. 1274–1305) and countess of Champagne (r. 1274–1305); born on January 14, 1273 (some sources cite 1271), in Bar-sur-Seine, France; died on April 2, 1305, in Vincennes, Paris, France; daughter of Henry I, king of Navarre (r. 1270–1274), and Blanche of Artois (c. 1247–1302, daughter of Robert I, count of Artois); married Philip IV the Fair (1268–1314), king of France (r. 1285–1314), in 1284; children:Isabella of France (1296–1358, who married Edward II of England); Louis X (1289–1316), king of France (r. 1314–1316); Philip V (1293–1322), king of France (1316–1322); Charles IV (1294–1328), king of France (r. 1322–1328), and king of Navarre as Charles I (r. 1322–1328).

Joan I of Navarre was born in 1273 in Barsur-Seine, France, the daughter of Henry I, king of Navarre, and Blanche of Artois . Joan came to the throne as queen of Navarre on the death of her father in 1274, giving her hegemony over the lands of Navarre, Brie, and Champagne. Though her kingdom was annexed to France by her marriage to the powerful king Philip IV the Fair, she seems to have been allowed to continue free reign over her lands. Wrote Sarah Josepha Hale in her Woman's Record; Or, Sketches of all Distinguished Women, from "The Beginning" till A.D. 1850: "When the Count de Bar attacked Champagne, [Joan I] placed herself at the head of a small army, forced him to surrender, and kept him a long time in prison." Joan I of Navarre founded the College of Navarre in 1304.