Sinclair, Catherine (1780–1864)

views updated

Sinclair, Catherine (1780–1864)

Scottish novelist and children's writer. Born April 17, 1780, in Edinburgh, Scotland; died Aug 6, 1864, in London, England; 4th dau. of Sir John Sinclair (politician and agriculturist) and Diana (Macdonald) Sinclair; aunt of Lucy Walford (1845–1915); never married; no children.

Prolific and popular writer whose early children's book Holiday House: A Series of Tales (1839) marked a turning point in the history of children's literature, served as her father's secretary (1814–35); wrote several guidebooks, including Shetland and the Shetlanders and Scotland and the Scotch (both 1840), which are steeped in the history and folklore of the regions; following father's death, produced 2 lengthy but well-received novels, Modern Accomplishments, or the March of the Intellect (1836) and its conclusion, Modern Society: or, The March of Intellect (1837); a devout Protestant, strongly anti-Catholic, used her writing to expose "papists" in Popish Legends or Bible Truths (1852), Modern Superstition (1857), and the scathing Beatrice (1852); also wrote a number of religious tracts; her final and most popular projects were her Letters (1861–64) for children.

See also Women in World History.

About this article

Sinclair, Catherine (1780–1864)

Updated About encyclopedia.com content Print Article Share Article