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Roberts, Cokie (1943–)

Roberts, Cokie (1943–)

American television journalist. Born Mary Martha Corinne Morrison Clairborne Boggs, Dec 27, 1943, in New Orleans, LA; dau. of Hale Boggs and Lindy Boggs (both US congressional representatives); Wellesley College, graduate in political science, 1964; m. Steve Roberts (professor and journalist); children: Lee and Rebecca.

Was a contributor to PBS-TV's "MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour"; co-hosted "The Lawmakers" (1981–84); served as congres sional correspondent for NPR for 10 years and as a political commentator for ABC News; co-anchored "This Week with Sam Donaldson and Cokie Roberts" (1996–2002); wrote We Are Our Mother's Daughters (1998) and Founding Mothers: The Women Who Raised Our Nation (2004). Received Edward R. Murrow Award and Everett McKinley Dirksen Award.

See also memoir, From This Day Forward (2000).

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