vermouth

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vermouth Fortified wine (about 16% alcohol by volume) flavoured with herbs and quinine. French vermouth is dry and colourless; Italian may be red or white and is sweet. Drunk as an aperitif, either with soda or with gin or vodka (a martini). Name originally derived from German Wermut for wormwood, a toxic ingredient that was included in early vermouths (see absinthe). Sweet or Italian vermouth, 15–17% alcohol (by volume), 12–20% sugar (by weight). Dry or French type, 18–20% alcohol, 3–5% sugar.

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ver·mouth / vərˈmoō[unvoicedth]/ • n. a red or white wine flavored with aromatic herbs, chiefly made in France and Italy and drunk mixed with gin.

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vermouth (vərmōōth´), blend of white wines fortified with additional alcohol and flavored with aromatic herbs, spices, and roots. It contains up to 19% alcohol. The sweeter, darker type of vermouth is sometimes called Italian vermouth, and the lighter, drier type, French vermouth. Vermouth is used as an appetizer and as a mixer in cocktails.

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vermouth white wine flavoured with wormwood, etc. XIX. — F. vermout — G. wermut (see WORMWOOD), with assim. to the early G. sp. wermuth.