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comb

comb / kōm/ • n. 1. a strip of plastic, metal, or wood with a row of narrow teeth, used for untangling or arranging the hair. ∎  [in sing.] an instance of untangling or arranging the hair with such a device: she gave her hair a comb. ∎  a short curved device of this type, worn by women to hold hair in place or as an ornament. 2. something resembling a comb in function or structure, in particular: ∎ a device for removing loose hair from an animal, esp. a dog or cat. ∎  a device for separating and dressing textile fibers. ∎  a row of brass points for collecting the electricity in an electrostatic generator. 3. the red fleshy crest on the head of a domestic fowl, esp. a rooster. 4. short for honeycomb (sense 1). • v. [tr.] 1. untangle or arrange (the hair) by drawing a comb through it. ∎  (comb something out) remove something from the hair by drawing a comb through it. ∎  curry (a horse). 2. prepare (wool, flax, or cotton) for manufacture with a comb. ∎  [usu. as adj.] (combed) treat (a fabric) in such a way: soft combed cotton. 3. search carefully and systematically: police combed the area [intr.] his mother combed through the boxes. DERIVATIVES: comb·like / -ˌlīk/ adj.

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comb

comb toothed implement for straightening the hair; cock's crest, which is indented or serrated OE.; flat cake of cells of wax made by bees (an exclusively Eng. use, the orig, of which is doubtful), late OE. in huniġcamb honeycomb. OE. camb, comb = OS. camb, OHG. kamb (G. kamm), ON. kambr :- Gmc. *kambaz :- IE. *gombhos, whence also Gr. gómphos, Skr. jámbha-, OSl. zōbū tooth.
Hence comb vb. XIV; repl. kemb, OE. cemban (:- Gmc. *kambjan), which survives in UNKEMPT.

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combing

combing, process that follows carding in the preparation of fibers for spinning, lays the fibers parallel, and removes noils (short fibers). The modern combing machine is a specialized carding machine. Combing produces a fine sliver suitable for drawing out and spinning into strong, smooth yarn. The process, used for long staple cottons and worsted yarn, is expensive, since up to 25% of the card sliver is eliminated. Hackling is a form of combing, often by hand, used for linen.

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comb

comb a comb (for carding wool) is the emblem of St Blaise.

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comb

comb. See camp.

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comb

combbrome, chrome, comb, Crome, dome, foam, gnome, holm, Holme, hom, home, Jerome, loam, Nome, ohm, om, roam, Rome, tome •Guillaume • biome • Beerbohm •radome • astrodome • Styrofoam •megohm • Stockholm • Bornholm •motorhome • backcomb • honeycomb •cockscomb, coxcomb •toothcomb • genome • gastronome •metronome • syndrome • palindrome •polychrome • Nichrome •monochrome • velodrome •hippodrome • aerodrome •cyclostome • rhizome

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