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canvas

can·vas / ˈkanvəs/ • n. a strong, coarse unbleached cloth made from hemp, flax, cotton, or a similar yarn, used to make items such as sails and tents and as a surface for oil painting: [as adj.] a canvas bag. ∎  a piece of such cloth prepared for use as the surface for an oil painting. ∎  an oil painting. ∎  a variety of canvas with an open weave, used as a basis for tapestry and embroidery. ∎  (the canvas) the floor of a boxing or wrestling ring, having a canvas covering. ∎  either of a racing boat's tapering ends, originally covered with canvas. • v. (-vased, -vas·ing) [tr.] (usu. be canvased) cover with canvas: the door had been canvased over.

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"canvas." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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canvas

canvas, strong, coarse cloth of cotton, flax, hemp, or other fibers, early used as sailcloth. Left in its natural color, bleached, or dyed, it has a wide variety of uses, as for game, duffel, sport, mail, and nose bags, tennis shoes, covers, tents, and awnings. Waterproofed with tar, paint, or the like, it is called tarpaulin and used to protect boats, hatches, and machinery. Duck is a fine light quality used for summer clothing, awnings, and sails. Artists' canvas is a light, smooth, single-warp texture, specially treated to receive paint. Art or embroidery canvas is an open-mesh type, usually linen, for working in crewels and for needlepoint.

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Canvas

Canvas

paintings collectively; sails collectively; tents collectively; also used figuratively to mean a wide range, a large expanse.

Example: canvas of fancy, 1822.

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canvas

canvas strong hemp or flax cloth. XIV. ME. canevas — ONF. (and mod.) canevas, var. of OF. chanevaz :- Rom. *cannapāceum, f. *cannapum, for L. cannabis HEMP.

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canvas

canvas •Malthus •acanthus, agapanthus, clianthus, dianthus, helianthus, polyanthus •Hyacinthus • Aegisthus • traverse •canvas, canvass •Selvas • grievous • mischievous •redivivus • fulvous • nervous •Peleus, rebellious •Kansas • Jesus

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Canvas

Canvas ★★½ 2006 (PG-13)

Convincing performances help out a somewhat familiar plot about mental illness. Ten-year-old Chris (Gearhart) returns home after a stay with relatives. His mom, Mary (Harden), was hospitalized for schizophrenia and her sanity is still in question, despite the best efforts of hard-working hubby John (Pantoliano). Countless problems inundate their lives as Mary becomes more disruptive and an embarrassment Chris finds hard to bear. 101m/C DVD . William Morrissey, Marcia Gay Harden, Joe Pantoliano, Devon Gearhart, Marcus Johns, Sophia Bairley; D: Joseph Greco; W: Joseph Greco; C: Rob Sweeney; M: Joel Goodman.

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