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Dickinson, Emily: Further Reading

EMILY DICKINSON: FURTHER READING

Bibliographies

Duchac, Joseph. The Poems of Emily Dickinson: An Annotated Guide to Commentary Published in English, 1890-1977. Boston, G. K. Hall, 1979, 658 p.

A comprehensive survey of criticism on Dickinson published between 1890 and 1977.

——. The Poems of Emily Dickinson: An Annotated Guide to Commentary Published in English, 1978-1989. Boston, G. K. Hall, 1993, 525 p.

A comprehensive survey of criticism on Dickinson published between 1978 and 1989.

Biographies

Habegger, Alfred. My Wars are Laid Away in Books: The Life of Emily Dickinson. New York: Random House, 2001, 764 p.

Comprehensive account of Dickinson's life.

Wolff, Cynthia Griffin. Emily Dickinson. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1988, 635 p.

Provides an in-depth bio-critical survey of Dickinson's life and career.

Criticism

Eberwein, Jane Donahue. "Ministerial Interviews and Fathers in Faith." Emily Dickinson Journal 9, no. 2 (2000): 6-15.

Discusses the two ministers who served the Amherst, Massachusetts church that Dickinson's family attended, speculating on the influence that they may have had on her work.

Grabher, Gudrun Roland Hagenbüchle, and Cristanne Miller, eds. The Emily Dickinson Handbook. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1998, 480 p.

Comprehensive reference source containing essays on the poet's life and work; also contains commentary on the state of modern Dickinson scholarship.

Landry, H. Jordan. "Animal/Insectual/Lesbian Sex: Dickinson's Queer Version of the Birds and the Bees." Emily Dickinson Journal 9, no. 2 (2000): 42-54.

Interprets Dickinson's use of insect and bird imagery as the poet's means of reimagining gender and sexual roles.

Martin, Wendy, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Emily Dickinson. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002, 248 p.

Collection of scholarly essays focusing on Dickinson's biography and the publication history of her works, her poetic strategies and themes, and the cultural contexts inferred from her poetry.

Messmer, Marietta. A Vice for Voices: Reading Emily Dickinson's Correspondence. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2001, 280 p.

Surveys Dickinson's letters in an effort to elucidate the poet's inspiration and literary genius.

Ramirez, Anne West. "Harriet Beecher Stowe's Christian Feminism in The Minister's Wooing: A Precedent for Emily Dickinson." Christianity and Literature 51, no. 3 (spring 2002): 407-24.

Examines the similarities between Dickinson's verse and Stowe's novel, outlining the women's shared cultural history.

Raymond, Claire. "Emily Dickinson as the Un-named, Buried Child." Emily Dickinson Journal 12, no. 1 (2003): 107-22.

Analyzes Dickinson's narrative technique of assuming the voice of a dead child and considers the device as a comment on gender roles and identity.

Shoobridge, Helen. "'Reverence for each Other Being the Sweet Aim': Emily Dickinson Face to Face with the Masculine." Emily Dickinson Journal 9, no. 1 (spring 2000): 87-111.

Employs the theories of Luce Irigaray to examine Dickinson's letters, suggesting that the poet's intention was to communicate with and educate men.

Vendler, Helen. "Emily Dickinson Thinking." Parnassus: Poetry in Review 26, no. 1 (2001): 34-56.

Detailed analysis of Dickinson's treatment of time in her poetry.

OTHER SOURCES FROM GALE:

Additional coverage of Dickinson's life and career is contained in the following sources published by the Gale Group: American Writers; American Writers Retrospective Supplement, Vol. 1; Authors and Artists for Young Adults, Vol. 22; Concise Dictionary of American Literary Biography, 1865-1917; Dictionary of Literary Biography, Vols. 1, 243; DISCovering Authors; DISCovering Authors: British Edition and Canadian Edition; DISCovering Authors Modules: Most-studied Authors and Poets; DISCovering Authors 3.0; Exploring Poetry; Literature Resource Center; Modern American Women Writers; Nineteenth-Century Literature Criticism, Vols. 21, 77; Poetry Criticism, Vol. 1; Poetry for Students, Vols. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 13, 16; Poets: American and British; Reference Guide to American Literature, Ed. 4; Something about the Author, Vol. 29; Twayne's United States Authors; World Literature Criticism; World Poets; and Writers for Young Adults.

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