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tuck

tuck / tək/ • v. 1. [tr.] push, fold, or turn (the edges or ends of something, esp. a garment or bedclothes) so as to hide them or hold them in place: he tucked his shirt into his trousers. ∎  (tuck someone in) make someone, esp. a child, comfortable in bed by pulling the edges of the bedclothes firmly under the mattress: he carried her back to bed and tucked her in. ∎  draw (something, esp. part of one's body) together into a small space: she tucked her legs under her. ∎  (often be tucked) put (something) away in a specified place or way so as to be hidden, safe, comfortable, or tidy: the colonel was coming toward her, his gun tucked under his arm. 2. [tr.] make a flattened, stitched fold in (a garment or material), typically so as to shorten or tighten it, or for decoration. • n. 1. a flattened, stitched fold in a garment or material, typically one of several parallel folds put in a garment for shortening, tightening, or decoration: a dress with tucks along the bodice. ∎  inf. a surgical operation to reduce surplus flesh or fat: a tummy tuck. 2. (also tuck position) (in diving, gymnastics, downhill skiing, etc.) a position with the knees bent and held close to the chest, often with the hands clasped around the shins. PHRASAL VERBS: tuck something away 1. store something in a secure place: employees can tuck away a percentage of their pretax salary. ∎  (usu. be tucked away) put or keep someone or something in an inconspicuous or concealed place: the police station was tucked away in a square behind the main street. 2. inf. eat a lot of food. tuck in (or into) inf. eat food heartily: I tucked into the bacon and scrambled eggs.

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tuck

tuck fold or pleat of drapery XIV; gathering of ends XVII; hearty meal XIX (hence tuck-shop pastry-cook's shop). f. tuck vb. pull or gather up; put up or away XIV; consume (food) XVIII (also intr. tuck in XIX) — MLG., MDu. tucken ( = OHG. zucchen, G. zucken twitch, snatch), f. Gmc. base *teux- (see TUG).

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tuck

tuckbuck, Canuck, chuck, cluck, cruck, duck, fuck, luck, muck, pluck, puck, ruck, schmuck, shuck, struck, stuck, suck, truck, tuck, upchuck, yuck •blackbuck • reedbuck • sawbuck •roebuck • bushbuck • megabuck •woodchuck • shelduck • Habakkuk •stagestruck • awestruck • moonstruck •dumbstruck • thunderstruck

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