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relative

rel·a·tive / ˈrelətiv/ • adj. 1. considered in relation or in proportion to something else: the relative effectiveness of the various mechanisms is not known. ∎  existing or possessing a specified characteristic only in comparison to something else; not absolute: she went down the steps into the relative darkness of the dining room the companies are relative newcomers to computers. 2. Gram. denoting a pronoun, determiner, or adverb that refers to an expressed or implied antecedent and attaches a subordinate clause to it, e.g., which, who. ∎  (of a clause) attached to an antecedent by a relative word. 3. Mus. (of major and minor keys) having the same key signature. 4. (of a service rank) corresponding in grade to another in a different service. • n. 1. a person connected by blood or marriage: much of my time is spent visiting relatives. ∎  a species related to another by common origin: the plant is a relative of ivy. 2. Gram. a relative pronoun, determiner, or adverb. 3. Philos. a term, thing, or concept that is dependent on something else. PHRASES: relative to 1. in comparison with: the figures suggest that girls are underachieving relative to boys. ∎  in terms of a connection to: some stars appear to change their position relative to each other. 2. in connection with; concerning: if you have any questions relative to payment, please contact us. DERIVATIVES: rel·a·tiv·al / ˌreləˈtīvəl/ adj. (in sense 2 of the noun ).

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relative

relative. Term used to indicate connection between a major and a minor key having same key signature, e.g. A minor is the relative minor of C major, and C major the relative major of A minor.

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