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oblique

o·blique / əˈblēk; ōˈblēk/ • adj. 1. neither parallel nor at a right angle to a specified or implied line; slanting: we sat on the settee oblique to the fireplace. ∎  not explicit or direct in addressing a point: he issued an oblique attack on the president. ∎  Geom. (of a line, plane figure, or surface) inclined at other than a right angle. ∎  Geom. (of an angle) acute or obtuse. ∎  Geom. (of a cone, cylinder, etc.) with an axis not perpendicular to the plane of its base. ∎  Anat. (esp. of a muscle) neither parallel nor perpendicular to the long axis of a body or limb. 2. Gram. denoting any case other than the nominative or vocative. • n. 1. a muscle neither parallel nor perpendicular to the long axis of a body or limb. 2. Brit. another term for slash1 (sense 2). DERIVATIVES: o·blique·ly adv. o·blique·ness n. o·bliq·ui·ty / əˈblikwətē/ n.

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OBLIQUE

OBLIQUE, also diagonal, oblique dash, oblique stroke, slash, solidus, virgule. The PUNCTUATION MARK (/), a forward-sloping line used in writing and printing. The device has six main uses: (1) To indicate vulgar fractions (23/24 for twenty-three twenty fourths) and ratios (miles/hour for miles per hour). (2) As part of certain abbreviations and related symbols, such as c/o care of, i/c in charge, and the percentage sign %. (3) To mark the ends of lines of poetry when set in a prose text (as in Tyger Tyger, burning bright / In the forests of the night). (4) To unite alternatives as in and/or, colour/color, his/her, and s/he (for ‘she or he’). (5) To indicate routes, as in London/New York/San Francisco. (6) In PHONETICS, to mark off phonemic transcription, as in /wik/, denoting the pronunciation of the words week and weak. The reverse oblique (\), is known as a back-slash.

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oblique

oblique having a slanting or sloping direction XV; (gram.) XVI. — (O)F. — L. oblīquus, f. OB- + obscure el.
So obliquity divergence from moral rectitude XV; oblique direction XVI.

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oblique

obliqueantique, batik, beak, bespeak, bezique, bleak, boutique, cacique, caïque, cheek, chic, clique, creak, creek, critique, Dominique, eke, freak, geek, Greek, hide-and-seek, keek, Lalique, leak, leek, Martinique, meek, midweek, Mozambique, Mustique, mystique, oblique, opéra comique, ortanique, peak, Peake, peek, physique, pique, pratique, reek, seek, shriek, Sikh, sleek, sneak, speak, Speke, squeak, streak, teak, technique, tongue-in-cheek, tweak, unique, veronique, weak, week, wreak •stickybeak • grosbeak • houseleek •forepeak • technospeak • newspeak •doublespeak • hairstreak • tugrik •fenugreek • Realpolitik • Ostpolitik •pipsqueak • workweek

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