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lifeboat

life·boat / ˈlīfˌbōt/ • n. a specially constructed boat launched from land to rescue people in distress at sea. ∎  a small boat kept on a ship for use in emergency, typically one of a number on deck or suspended from davits. DERIVATIVES: life·boat·man / -mən/ n. (pl. -men) .

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lifeboat

lifeboatafloat, bloat, boat, capote, coat, connote, cote, dote, emote, float, gloat, goat, groat, misquote, moat, mote, note, oat, outvote, promote, quote, rote, shoat, smote, stoat, Succoth, table d'hôte, Terre Haute, throat, tote, vote, wrote •flatboat •mailboat, sailboat, whaleboat •speedboat • keelboat •dreamboat, steamboat •lifeboat • iceboat • longboat •sauceboat • houseboat •rowboat, showboat •U-boat • tugboat • gunboat •powerboat • motorboat • riverboat •workboat • Haggadoth • anecdote •scapegoat • redingote • nanny goat •zygote • redcoat • tailcoat • raincoat •waistcoat • greatcoat • petticoat •topcoat • housecoat • undercoat •entrecôte • surcoat • turncoat •matelote • banknote • headnote •endnote • keynote • woodnote •footnote • compote • whitethroat •shofroth • bluethroat • cut-throat •creosote • mitzvoth • mezuzoth

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Lifeboat

Lifeboat ★★★½ 1944

When a German U-boat sinks a freighter during WWII, the eight survivors seek refuge in a tiny lifeboat. Tension peaks after the drifting passengers take in a stranded Nazi. Hitchcock saw a great challenge in having the entire story take place in a lifeboat and pulled it off with his usual flourish. In 1989, the film “Dead Calm” replicated the technique. From a story by John Steinbeck. Bankhead shines. 96m/B VHS, DVD . Tallulah Bankhead, John Hodiak, William Bendix, Canada Lee, Walter Slezak, Hume Cronyn, Henry Hull, Mary Anderson, Heather Angel, William Yetter Jr.; D: Alfred Hitchcock; W: Jo Swerling; C: Glen MacWilliams; M: Hugo Friedhofer. N.Y. Film Critics ‘44: Actress (Bankhead).

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