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criminal

crim·i·nal / ˈkrimənl/ • n. a person who has committed a crime. • adj. of or relating to a crime. ∎  Law of or relating to crime as opposed to civil matters. ∎ inf. (of an action or situation) deplorable and shocking. DERIVATIVES: crim·i·nal·i·ty / ˌkriməˈnalitē/ n. crim·i·nal·ly adv.

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Criminal

CRIMINAL

Pertaining to, or involving, crimes or the administration of penal justice. An individual who has been found guilty of the commission of conduct that causes social harm and that is punishable by law; a person who has committed a crime.

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criminal

criminalannal, channel, flannel, impanel, multichannel, panel •cracknel •grapnel, shrapnel •carnal •antennal, crenel, fennel, kennel •regnal •anal, decanal •adrenal, officinal, penal, renal, venal •signal, spignel •hymnal • cardinal • libidinal • ordinal •attitudinal, latitudinal, longitudinal •altitudinal •imaginal, paginal •marginal, submarginal •aboriginal • virginal • disciplinal •seminal •criminal, liminal, subliminal •abdominal, nominal, phenomenal, pronominal •noumenal •germinal, terminal •vaticinal, vicinal •sentinel • intestinal • Juvenaldoctrinal, final, semi-final, spinal, urinal, vaginal •quarterfinal •cantonal, O'Connell •cornel • nounal •atonal, Donal, hormonal, Monel, patronal, polytonal, tonal, zonal •motional •lagoonal, monsoonal, tribunal •communal •Chunnel, funnel, gunnel, gunwale, runnel, tunnel •autumnal • meridional •embryonal, Lionel •diagonal, heptagonal, hexagonal, octagonal, tetragonal •trigonal • orthogonal • occasional •divisional, provisional, visional •delusional, fusional, illusional •regional • original • coronal • arsenal •medicinal •impersonal, interpersonal, personal, transpersonal •irrational, national, passional, rational •factional, fractional, redactional, transactional •confessional, congressional, expressional, impressional, obsessional, processional, professional, progressional, recessional, secessional, sessional, successional •connectional, correctional, directional, interjectional, intersectional, sectional, unidirectional •ascensional, attentional, conventional, declensional, intentional, tensional, three-dimensional, two-dimensional •conceptional, exceptional, perceptional •durational, locational, oblational, relational, vocational •rotational •additional, positional, tuitional, volitional •fictional, jurisdictional •inscriptional • optional • proportional •devotional, emotional, notional, promotional •constitutional, evolutional, institutional, substitutional •constructional, fluxional, instructional •conjunctional, dysfunctional, functional, multifunctional •versional • seasonal •colonel, diurnal, eternal, external, fraternal, infernal, internal, journal, kernel, maternal, nocturnal, paternal, supernal, vernal

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Criminal

Criminal ★★½ 2004 (R)

Experienced con man takes a novice under his wing to help bilk a rich collector. But like most con/heist flicks, everything is not what it seems. Complex and enjoyable remake of Argentine filmmaker Fabian Bielinski's “Nine Queens.” Reilly and Luna give great performances, as do Gyllenhaal and Mullan. Fun in the vein of “Matchstick Men”, full of twists and turns with a terrific payoff. 87m/C DVD . US John C. Reilly, Diego Luna, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Jonathan Tucker, Peter Mullan; D: Gregory Jacobs; W: Gregory Jacobs, Steven Soderbergh; C: Chris Menges; M: Alex Wurman.

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