Skip to main content
Select Source:

advocate

advocate (ad-vŏ-kăt) n. (in health care) a practitioner, usually a nurse, who utilizes this role to promote and safeguard the wellbeing and interests of his or her patients or clients by ensuring they are aware of their rights and have access to information to make informed decisions. Advocacy in health care is an integral part of professional practice.
advocacy (ad-vŏ-kă-si) n. www.dh.gov.uk/en/Policyandguidance/Healthandsocialcaretopics/Socialcare/IMCA/index.htm Explanation of an advocate's role in mental health care from the Department of Health www.alcoholics-anonymous.co.uk The AA website www.bbc.co.uk/health/conditions/allergies Explanation of what allergies are and how they can be treated from a BBC website www.alzheimers.org.uk Website of the Alzheimer's Society www.rcpsych.ac.uk/mentalhealthinformation/mentalhealthproblems/eatingdisorders.aspx Explanation of eating disorders, including downloadable leaflets, from the Royal College of Psychiatrists www.asthma.org.uk Website of the charity Asthma www.chadd.org This US website focuses on people with ADHD

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"advocate." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jun. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"advocate." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/advocate

"advocate." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved June 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/advocate

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

advocate

ad·vo·cate • n. / ˈadvəkit/ a person who publicly supports or recommends a particular cause or policy: he was an untiring advocate of economic reform. ∎  a person who pleads on someone else's behalf. ∎  a pleader in a court of law; a lawyer. • v. / -ˌkāt/ [tr.] publicly recommend or support: they advocated adherence to Islam. DERIVATIVES: ad·vo·ca·tion / ˌadvəˈkāshən/ n. ad·vo·ca·tor / -ˌkātər/ n.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"advocate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jun. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"advocate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/advocate-0

"advocate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/advocate-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Advocate

ADVOCATE

To support or defend by argument; to recommend publicly. An individual who presents or argues another's case; one who gives legal advice and pleads the cause of another before a court or tribunal; a counselor. A person admitted to thepractice of lawwho advises clients of their legal rights and argues their cases in court.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Advocate." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jun. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Advocate." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/advocate

"Advocate." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved June 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/advocate

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

advocate

advocate ME a(d)vocat — (O)F. avocat — L. advocātus, sb. use of pp. of advocāre call in as witness or counsellor, f. AD- + vocāre call. The form with ad- is due to latinization.
So advocate vb. XVII.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"advocate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jun. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"advocate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/advocate-1

"advocate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved June 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/advocate-1

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

advocate

advocate: see attorney.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"advocate." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jun. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"advocate." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/advocate

"advocate." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved June 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/advocate

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

advocate

advocate •defalcate • demarcate • cheapskate •eradicate • abdicate •dedicate, medicate, predicate •indicate, syndicate, vindicate •adjudicate • defecate •certificate, pontificate •confiscate • replicate • explicate •spifflicate • triplicate • implicate •complicate •duplicate, quadruplicate, quintuplicate •supplicate • fornicate •communicate, excommunicate, intercommunicate, tunicate •divaricate, prevaricate •fabricate • deprecate • metricate •extricate •lubricate, rubricate •desiccate • intoxicate • masticate •authenticate • domesticate •sophisticate • prognosticate •rusticate • hypothecate • manducate •educate • obfuscate • inculcate •bifurcate • suffocate • allocate •dislocate • reciprocate • coruscate •altercate • advocate • equivocate •furcate

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"advocate." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Jun. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"advocate." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 20, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/advocate

"advocate." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved June 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/advocate

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.