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abstract

ab·stract • adj. / abˈstrakt; ˈabˌstrakt/ existing in thought or as an idea but not having a physical or concrete existence: abstract concepts such as love or beauty. ∎  dealing with ideas rather than events: the novel was too abstract to sustain much attention. ∎  not based on a particular instance; theoretical: we have been discussing the problem in a very abstract manner. ∎  (of a word, esp. a noun) denoting an idea, quality, or state rather than a concrete object. ∎  of or relating to art that uses shapes, forms, colors, and textures to create suggestive effects rather than realistic images. • v. / abˈstrakt/ [tr.] 1. consider (something) theoretically or separately from something else: abstracting religion from its historical context. ∎  [intr.] form a general idea in this way: he cannot form a general notion by abstracting from particulars. 2. extract or remove (something). 3. make a written summary of (an article or book): he abstracts material for an online database. • n. / ˈabˌstrakt/ 1. a summary or statement of the contents of a book, article, or formal speech. 2. an abstract work of art. 3. (the abstract) that which is abstract; the theoretical consideration of something. PHRASES: in the abstract in a general way; without reference to specific instances.DERIVATIVES: ab·stract·ly adv. ab·strac·tor / -tər/ n. (in sense 3 of the v.).

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"abstract." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Jun. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Abstract

ABSTRACT

To take or withdraw from; as, to abstract the funds of a bank. To remove or separate. To summarize or abridge.

An abstract comprises—or concentrates in itself—the essential qualities of a larger thing—or of several things—in a short, abbreviated form. It differs from a transcript, which is a verbatim copy of the thing itself and is more comprehensive.

cross-references

Abstract of Title.

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abstract

abstract adj. XIV, sb. XV. — (O)F. †abstract or L. abstractus, pp. of abstrahere, f. ABS- + trahere draw.
So abstract vb. XV. Partly f. pp. †abstract, partly f. L. abstract-, pp. stem of abstrahere. abstraction XV.

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ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT. A summary of a statement, thesis, paper, or other document, usually providing its gist (essential elements and argument). See ABRIDG(E)MENT.

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abstract

abstractabreact, abstract, act, attract, bract, compact, contract, counteract, diffract, enact, exact, extract, fact, humpbacked, hunchbacked, impact, interact, matter-of-fact, pact, protract, redact, refract, retroact, subcontract, subtract, tact, tract, transact, unbacked, underact, untracked •play-act • autodidact •artefact (US artifact) • cataract •contact •marked, unremarked •Wehrmacht •affect, bisect, bull-necked, collect, confect, connect, correct, defect, deflect, deject, detect, direct, effect, eject, elect, erect, expect, infect, inflect, inject, inspect, interconnect, interject, intersect, misdirect, neglect, object, perfect, project, prospect, protect, reflect, reject, respect, resurrect, sect, select, subject, suspect, transect, unchecked, Utrecht •prefect • abject • retroject • intellect •genuflect • idiolect • dialect • aspect •circumspect • retrospect • Dordrecht •vivisect • architect • unbaked •sun-baked

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