Skip to main content
Select Source:

Conservationist

Conservationist


If you love hiking, camping, being outdoors, and have a concern that future generations will not have the opportunity to enjoy our natural resources,

then becoming a conservationist may be the career for you. Conservation is based on collecting, processing, and managing data regarding water, wildlife, land, vegetation, and the environment.

The need for conservationists has arisen because of the demands on natural resources. The formal education required to be a conservationist includes a college degree in the sciences and probably an advanced degree in an area of specialty. With an education geared toward conservation, there are a variety of jobs that one could attain. Data collection would be an appropriate job for someone who prefers to be outside interacting with nature. Another job might entail working with environmental policy, regulations, and legislation. Yet another could be working in higher education, sharing the field of environmental awareness.

Conservationists use mathematics when dealing with measurement, statistics, and technology. Collecting data regarding populations and quantities of land or resources is done first. Depending on the type of information being collected, computers can sometimes aid in the collection process. Information is entered into a computer to be organized and evaluated. With the increased popularity and necessity for this field, new programs and technology are emerging to make the details more complete and informative. Conservationists are looking for trends and continually assess and monitor natural resources to assist in developing strategies for their conservation.

see also Global Positioning System.

Elizabeth Sweeney

Bibliography

Career Information Center, 8th ed. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2002.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Conservationist." Mathematics. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Conservationist." Mathematics. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 21, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/conservationist

"Conservationist." Mathematics. . Retrieved February 21, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/conservationist

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

conservationist

conservationist •Hispanist • Zenist • pyrotechnist •Jainist • liberationist •machinist, tambourinist •hygienist • trampolinist •mandolinist, violinist •unwitnessed •misogynist, philogynist •Stalinist • Hellenist • feminist •illuminist • determinist • Leninist •alpinist • larcenist • Latinist •Byzantinist • Calvinist • chauvinist •Darwinist •honest, monist •corniced, hornist •trombonist • vibraphonist •sousaphonist •balloonist, bassoonist, cartoonist, lampoonist •opportunist • communist • pianist •Fabianist • accordionist • alienist •unionist • Zionist • urbanist •hedonist • modernist • telephonist •symphonist •saxophonist, xylophonist •agonist, antagonist, protagonist •tobogganist • organist • revisionist •diffusionist, exclusionist, fusionist, illusionist •religionist • tobacconist • mechanist •Africanist • Vaticanist • colonist •Mammonist •harmonist, shamanist •humanist • Germanist • canonist •expansionist • onanist • timpanist •accompanist • ironist • Saxonist •Jansenist • arsonist • abstractionist •expressionist, impressionist, progressionist, secessionist •insurrectionist, perfectionist, projectionist, protectionist, rejectionist, vivisectionist •interventionist • receptionist •accommodationist, associationist, collaborationist, conservationist, creationist, deviationist, educationist, federationist, isolationist, preservationist, representationist, restorationist, revelationist, salvationist, situationist, vacationist •abolitionist, coalitionist, demolitionist, exhibitionist, intuitionist, nutritionist, partitionist, prohibitionist, requisitionist, traditionist •fictionist, restrictionist •abortionist, contortionist, extortionist •Confucianist, devolutionist, elocutionist, evolutionist, revolutionist •constructionist, percussionist •obstructionist, reductionist •excursionist •Neoplatonist, Platonist, satanist •botanist •earnest, Ernest

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"conservationist." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"conservationist." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 21, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/conservationist

"conservationist." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved February 21, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/conservationist

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.