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mound

mound1 / mound/ • n. a rounded mass projecting above a surface. ∎  a raised mass of earth, stones, or other compacted material, sometimes created artificially for purposes of defense or burial. ∎  a small hill. ∎  (a mound of/mounds of) a large pile or quantity of something: burying potential problems under mounds of cash. ∎  Baseball (in full pitcher’s mound) the elevated area from which the pitcher delivers the ball. • v. [tr.] heap up into a rounded pile: mound the pie filling slightly in the center. ∎ archaic enclose, bound, or fortify with an embankment: hills that mound the sea. PHRASES: take the mound Baseball (of a pitcher) have a turn at pitching: Morris will take the mound Tuesday. mound2 • n. archaic a ball representing the earth, used as part of royal regalia, e.g., on top of a crown, typically of gold and surmounted by a cross.

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mound

mound, prehistoric earthwork erected over a burial place as a memorial or landmark, a defensive embankment, or a site for ceremonial or religious rites. Such structures are found in many parts of the world, but the name is applied in particular to those of North America, ascribed to a people known as Mound Builders. Sometimes the term is also applied to heaps of community refuse, as in shell mound.

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mound

mound2 (dial.) hedge, fence; embankment XVI; artificial elevation of earth or stones, tumulus XVIII perh. f. the somewhat earlier mound vb. enclose with a fence, of unkn. orig.

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mound

mound1 † world XIII; orb intended to represent the globe XVI. — (O)F. monde :- L. mundus world (see MUNDANE).

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mound

moundabound, aground, around, astound, bound, compound, confound, dumbfound, expound, found, ground, hound, impound, interwound, mound, pound, profound, propound, redound, round, sound, stoneground, surround, theatre-in-the-round (US theater-in-the-round), underground, wound •spellbound • westbound • casebound •eastbound • windbound • hidebound •fogbound • stormbound •northbound • housebound •outbound • southbound • snowbound •weatherbound • earthbound •hellhound • greyhound • foxhound •newshound • wolfhound •bloodhound • background •battleground • campground •fairground • playground •whip-round • foreground •showground • merry-go-round •runaround • turnaround • ultrasound •pre-owned, unowned •unchaperoned • poind • untuned •Lund

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