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spoiler

spoil·er / ˈspoilər/ • n. 1. a person or thing that spoils. ∎  (esp. in a political context) a person who obstructs or prevents an opponent's success while having no chance of winning a contest themselves. ∎  an electronic device for preventing unauthorized copying of sound recordings by means of a disruptive signal inaudible on the original. 2. a flap on an aircraft or glider that can be projected from the surface of a wing in order to create drag and so reduce speed. ∎  a similar device on a motor vehicle intended to prevent it from being lifted off the road when traveling at very high speeds.

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spoiler

spoiler: see airplane.

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spoiler

spoilerbeguiler, compiler, Delilah, filer, Isla, miler, reviler, smiler, styler, tiler, Tyler •idler •stifler, trifler •recycler • Kreisler • profiler •stockpiler • freestyler • Rottweiler •ayatollah, choler, collar, corolla, dollar, dolour (US dolor), Hezbollah, holler, scholar, squalor, wallah, Waller, white-collar •cobbler, gobbler •Doppler, poplar •ostler •brawler, caller, crawler, drawler, faller, forestaller, hauler, installer, mauler, Paula, stonewaller, trawler •warbler • dawdler • footballer •reed-warbler •fowler, growler, howler, prowler, scowler •Angola, barbola, bipolar, bowler, bronchiolar, canola, carambola, circumpolar, coaler, Coca-Cola, cola, comptroller, consoler, controller, Ebola, eidola, extoller, Finola, Gorgonzola, granola, Hispaniola, kola, Lola, lunisolar, mandola, molar, multipolar, Ndola, patroller, payola, pianola, polar, roller, Savonarola, scagliola, scroller, sola, solar, stroller, tombola, Tortola, troller, Vignola, viola, Zola •ogler •teetotaller (US teetotaler) •potholer • steamroller • logroller •roadroller •boiler, broiler, Euler, oiler, spoiler, toiler •potboiler

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Spoiler

Spoiler ★½ 1998

Wrongly convicted Daniels is stuck in a sadistic 21st-century prison with just one aim—to escape and reunite with his young daughter. 100m/C VHS, DVD . Gary Daniels, Meg Foster, Bryan Genesse, Jeffrey Combs, Arye Gross, Duane Whitaker, David Groh; D: Carmen Von Daacke; W: Michael Kalesniko; C: Philip Lee. VIDEO

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