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charge

charge / chärj/ • v. [tr.] 1. demand (an amount) as a price from someone for a service rendered or goods supplied: the restaurant charged $15 for dinner [intr.] museums should charge for admission. ∎  (charge something to) record the cost of something as an amount payable by (someone) or on (an account): they charge the calls to their credit-card accounts. 2. accuse (someone) of something, esp. an offense under law: they were charged with assault. ∎  make an accusation or assertion that: opponents charged that below-cost pricing would reduce safety. ∎  Law accuse someone of (an offense). 3. entrust (someone) with a task as a duty or responsibility: the committee was charged with reshaping the educational system. 4. store electrical energy in (a battery or battery-operated device). ∎  [intr.] (of a battery or battery-operated device) receive and store electrical energy. ∎ technical or formal load or fill (a container, gun, etc.) to the full or proper extent. ∎  (usu. be charged with) fig. fill or pervade (something) with a quality or emotion: the air was charged with menace. 5. [intr.] rush forward in attack. ∎  [tr.] rush aggressively toward (someone or something) in attack. ∎  move quickly and with impetus: Henry charged up the staircase. 6. (usu. be charged with) Heraldry place a heraldic bearing on: a pennant argent, charged with a cross gules. • n. 1. a price asked for goods or services: an admission charge. ∎  a financial liability or commitment: an asset of $550,000 should have been taken as a charge on earnings. 2. an accusation, typically one formally made against a prisoner brought to trial: a charge of attempted murder. 3. the responsibility of taking care or control of someone or something: the people in her charge. ∎  a person or thing entrusted to the care of someone: the babysitter watched over her charges. ∎ dated a responsibility or onerous duty assigned to someone. ∎  an official instruction, esp. one given by a judge to a jury regarding points of law. 4. the property of matter that is responsible for electrical phenomena, existing in a positive or negative form. ∎  the quantity of this carried by a body. ∎  energy stored chemically for conversion into electricity. ∎  the process of storing electrical energy in a battery. ∎  [in sing.] inf. a thrill: I get a real charge out of working hard. 5. a quantity of explosive to be detonated, typically in order to fire a gun or similar weapon. 6. a headlong rush forward, typically one made by attacking soldiers in battle: a cavalry charge. ∎  the signal or call for such a rush. 7. Heraldry a device or bearing placed on a shield or crest. PHRASES: free of charge without any payment due. in charge in control or with overall responsibility. press (or prefer) charges accuse someone formally of a crime so that they can be brought to trial. take charge assume control or responsibility.DERIVATIVES: charge·a·ble adj.

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charge

charge, property of matter that gives rise to all electrical phenomena (see electricity). The basic unit of charge, usually denoted by e, is that on the proton or the electron; that on the proton is designated as positive (+e) and that on the electron is designated as negative (-e). All other charged elementary particles have charges equal to +e, -e, or some whole number times one of these, with the exception of the quark, whose charge could be 1/3e or 2/3e. Every charged particle is surrounded by an electric field of force such that it attracts any charge of opposite sign brought near it and repels any charge of like sign, the magnitude of this force being described by Coulomb's law (see electrostatics). This force is much stronger than the gravitational force between two particles and is responsible for holding protons and electrons together in atoms and for chemical bonding. When equal numbers of protons and electrons are present, the atom is electrically neutral, and more generally, any physical system containing equal numbers of positive and negative charges is neutral. Charge is a conserved quantity; the net electric charge in a closed physical system is constant (see conservation laws). Whenever charges are created, as in the decay of a neutron into a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino, equal amounts of positive and negative charge must be created. Although charge is conserved, it can be transferred from one body to another. Electric current, on which much of modern technology is dependent, is a flow of charge through a conductor (see conduction). Although current is usually treated as a continuous quantity, it actually consists of the transfer of millions of individual charges from atom to atom, typically by the transfer of electrons. A precise description of the behavior of electric charge in crystals and in systems of atomic and molecular dimensions requires the use of the quantum theory.

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Charge

CHARGE

To impose a burden, duty, obligation, or lien; to create a claim against property; to assess; to demand; to accuse; to instruct a jury on matters of law. To impose a tax, duty, or trust. To entrust with responsibilities and duties (e.g., care of another). In commercial transactions, to bill or invoice; to purchase on credit. Incriminal law, to indict or formally accuse.

An encumbrance, lien, or claim; a burden or load; an obligation or duty; a liability; an accusation. A person or thing committed to the care of another. The price of, or rate for, something.

A retail store may attach a finance charge to money owed by a customer on a store account.

A charge to the jury is the process whereby a judge addresses the jury before the verdict. During the charge, the judge summarizes the case and gives instructions to the jury concerning such matters as the rules of law that are applicable to various issues in the case.

A public charge is a person who has been made a ward of the state who requires public support due to illness or poverty.

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charge

charge †load, burden (material or immaterial) XIII; task or duty laid upon one, official instruction XIV; burden of expense; accusation XV; (from F.) impetuous onset XVI; (f. the vb.) quantity loaded (cf. CARGO) XVII. — (O)F. :- Rom. *carrica, f. late L. car(ri)cāre, f. L. carrus wagon, CAR; cf. CARRY.
So charge vb. †load, burden XIII; lay a duty or command upon; put to expense; lay blame or accusation upon XIV; (from F.) put (a weapon) in position for offence; make a powerful onset (upon) XVI.

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charge

charge
1. (explosive) The combination of detonator and main explosive. The effective energy released is a function of the nature and weight of the main explosive material, the type of detonator used, and how the charge is fired.

2. (electrical) A source of electric field forces; the transfer of such charge through a conducting medium is measured as electric current. Electric charge comprises whole-number multiples of electronic charge, of which the electron constitutes a negative charge.

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Charge

Charge

a load, burden, or weight; a quantity of ammunition powder for the firing of a gun; metallic ore to fill a furnace; a mental or moral load. See also burden, trust.

Examples: charge of curatesBk. of St. Albans, 1486; of electricity, 1782; of gunpowder, 1653; of intelligence, 1713; of lead ore, 1858; of money, 1653; of snuff, 1712; of shot, 1863; of taxisLipton, 1970.

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charge

charge.
1. Any device or bearing, charged, or carried on an escutcheon.

2. Ornament projecting from the face or soffit of, e.g., a piece of masonry.

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charge

charge in heraldry, a device or bearing placed on a shield or crest.

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charge

chargebarge, charge, enlarge, large, marge, raj, reportage, sarge, sparge, Swaraj, taj, undercharge •turbocharge • countercharge •cover charge • surcharge •camouflage • espionage •barrage, garage •massage • dressage • sabotage

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