Skip to main content
Select Source:

Pará rubber tree

Pará rubber tree (pärä´), large tree (Hevea brasiliensis) of the family Euphorbiaceae (spurge family), native to tropical South America and the source of the greatest amount and finest quality of natural rubber. Today most Pará rubber is produced from trees grown on plantations in Asia and to a lesser extent in Africa. The yellow or white latex from which rubber is made occurs in numerous specialized latex vessels in the bark, especially outside the phloem. The tree is tapped by making careful incisions, as deep as possible without injuring the tree's growth, in a herringbone pattern or often in a lefthand spiral of 30° around the trunk, for the latex vessels spiral to the right at an angle of about 30° from the horizontal. The latex is collected in small cups and then treated—usually by coagulating it with acid, pressing it free of water, and drying the resultant sheets in a smokehouse to ready them for shipment. The size of the tree, the quality of the latex, and the number of taps possible varies with individual trees; the quantity of latex increases with the age of the tree, which may grow to a height of over 100 ft (30 m). Cultivated trees are tapped throughout the year, usually in the early morning, when the latex flow is greatest. Sometimes other trees that yield latex are also called Pará rubber trees. Pará rubber trees are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Euphorbiales, family Euphorbiaceae.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Pará rubber tree." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Pará rubber tree." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/para-rubber-tree

"Pará rubber tree." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 16, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/para-rubber-tree

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

rubber tree

rubber tree Any of several South American trees whose exudations can be made into rubber; especially Hevea brasiliensis (family Euphorbiaceae), a tall softwood tree native to Brazil but introduced to Malaysia. The milky exudate, called latex, is obtained from the inner bark by tapping and then coagulated by smoking over fires or chemically.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"rubber tree." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"rubber tree." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rubber-tree

"rubber tree." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved August 16, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/rubber-tree

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.