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avocado

avocado Fruit of the tree Persica americana, also known as the avocado pear or alligator pear, because of its rough skin and pear shape, although it is not related to the pear. It is unusual among fruits for its high fat content (17–27%), of which 7–14% is linoleic acid, and also for the fact that it does not ripen until after it has been removed from the tree.

Half an avocado (130 g) is a rich source of vitamin C and copper; a good source of vitamin B6; a source of protein and iron; contains 26 g of fat, of which 20% is saturated; provides 2.6 g of dietary fibre; supplies 265 kcal (1110 kJ).

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avocado

av·o·ca·do / ˌavəˈkädō; ˌävə-/ • n. (pl. -os) 1. a pear-shaped fruit with a rough leathery skin, smooth oily edible flesh, and a large stone. Also called alligator pear. ∎  a light green color like that of the flesh of avocados. 2. the tropical evergreen tree (Persea americana, family Lauraceae) that bears this fruit. It is native to Central America and widely cultivated elsewhere. ORIGIN: mid 17th cent.: from Spanish, alteration of aguacate, from Nahuatl ahuacatl.

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avocado

avocado (ä´vəkä´do, ăv´–), tropical American broad-leaved evergreen tree of the genus Persea of the family Lauraceae (laurel family). The fruit, called avocado, alligator pear, or, in Spanish, aguacate, has a high oil content. It is eaten fresh, chiefly in salads and guacamole. The avocado was cultivated by the Aztecs. Avocados are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Magnoliales, family Lauraceae.

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avocado

avocado Evergreen, broad-leafed tree native to the tropical New World. The name is extended to its green to dark purple, pear-shaped fruit. Avocados have a high oil content and a nutty flavour. Weight: 200g (7oz) but exceptionally up to 2kg (4.4lb). Family Lauraceae; species Persea americana.

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avocado

avocado XVII (avogato). — Sp. avocado advocate substituted for Aztec ahuacatl, more closely repr. by Sp. aguacate; further corrupted, through avigato, to alligator (pear) XVIII.

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avocado

avocadoforeshadow, shadow •Faldo •accelerando, bandeau, Brando, glissando, Orlando •eyeshadow •aficionado, amontillado, avocado, Bardo, Barnardo, bastinado, bravado, Colorado, desperado, Dorado, eldorado, incommunicado, Leonardo, Mikado, muscovado, Prado, renegado, Ricardo, stifado •commando •eddo, Edo, meadow •crescendo, diminuendo, innuendo, kendo •carbonado, dado, Feydeau, gambado, Oviedo, Toledo, tornado •aikido, bushido, credo, Guido, Ido, libido, lido, speedo, teredo, torpedo, tuxedo •widow • dildo • window •Dido, Fido, Hokkaidocondo, rondeau, rondo, secondo, tondo •Waldo •dodo, Komodo, Quasimodo •escudo, judo, ludo, pseudo, testudo, Trudeau •weirdo • sourdough • fricandeau •tournedos • Murdo

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