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wolverine

wolverine or glutton, largest member of the weasel family, Gulo gulo, found in the northern parts of North America and Eurasia, usually in high mountains near the timberline or in tundra. It is a heavy, short-legged animal, somewhat bearlike in appearance, 3 to 31/2 ft (91–106 cm) long, including the 8-in. (20-cm) tail, and weighing 35 to 60 lb (16–27 kg). The tail is bushy and the paws large, with heavy claws. The long, dark brown fur is banded on the flank with chestnut or yellowish white. Extremely strong and fierce, the wolverine hunts a wide variety of animals, and will drive animals larger than itself away from a kill. It has been known to attack nearly every animal except humans. It robs traps of bait and victims and steals food supplies in camps; however, its reputation for gluttony is exaggerated. Its fur does not hold moisture and for this reason is highly prized by the Eskimos as a frost-proof trim for hoods and cuffs. Wolverines are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Carnivora, family Mustelidae.

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wolverine

wol·ver·ine / ˌwoŏlvəˈrēn/ • n. a heavily built short-legged carnivorous mammal of the weasel family, with a shaggy dark coat and a bushy tail, native to the tundra and forests of arctic and subarctic regions. Two species: Gulo luscus of North America and G. gulo of Europe.

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wolverine

wolverine Solitary, ferocious mammal native to pine forests of the USA and Eurasia, the largest member of the weasel family. Dark brown, with lighter bands along the sides and neck, it has a bushy tail and large feet. Length: 91cm (36in); weight: 30kg (66lb). Species Gulo gulo.

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wolverine

wolverine, -ene XVI (-ing). Obscurely f. wolv-, inflexional stem of WOLF.

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wolverine

wolverine (carcajou, glutton, skunk bear, Gulo gulo) See MUSTELIDAE.

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wolverine

wolverine •gamine • bromine • thiamine •dopamine • amphetamine • histamine •quinine • strychnine • mezzanine •spalpeen • Philippine • lycopene •gangrene • terrene • silkscreen •windscreen • citrine • Dexedrine •putting green • Benzedrine •Irene, polystyrene •widescreen • sight screen •chlorine, chorine, Doreen, Maureen, Noreen, taurine •smokescreen • rood screen •sunscreen • fluorine • helleborine •Gadarene • Hippocrene •glycerine (US glycerin), nitroglycerine (US nitroglycerin) •nectarine • wintergreen • Methedrine •evergreen • wolverine • vaccine •glassine • Essene • Rexine • piscine •epicene • glycine • pyroxene •Palaeocene (US Paleocene) •Pliocene • Miocene • Holocene •damascene • kerosene • Plasticine •Pleistocene

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Wolverine

Wolverine ★★ Code Name: Wolverine 1996 (R)

Former Navy SEAL Harry Gordini (Sabato Jr.) and his family are vacationing in Italy where he becomes an unwitting drug smuggler. After the drug cartel kidnaps his wife and son, Harry uses his training to attempt a rescue before the authorities intervene. Based on the book by Frederick Forsyth. Supplies the required action quotient. 91m/C VHS, DVD . Antonio Sabato Jr., Richard Brooks, Traci Lind, Daniel Quinn; D: David S. Jackson; W: Robert T. Megginson; C: Denis Maloney; M: Christopher Franke. TV

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Wolverine

Wolverine

The wolverine (Gulo gulo ) is an uncommonly large member of the weasel family (Mustelidae) that occurs in the subarctic and boreal forests of North America and northern Eurasia. The wolverine is famous for its aggressive, combative nature and its remarkable strength. Although the wolverine is only a mediumsized animal, it can dominate much larger animals during an aggressive encounter at a food source. For example, wolverines are capable of driving away a bear, or a group of wolves, from an animal carcass. If the movement of a moose or deer is hampered by snow, it can be killed by a single, much smaller wolverine.

Wolverines typically have a body length of 25.5-41 in (65-105 cm) plus a tail of about 8-12 in (20-30 cm). Adult animals weigh 30-60 lb (14-28 kg). Female wolverines are typically smaller than males. Wolverines have a long, dense, rather lustrous fur, usually dark brown or black. They generally have lighter brown-colored bands on each side of the body, extending from the shoulders to the rump.

Wolverines are rather omnivorous in their feeding habits. They are primarily eaters of carrion, that is, animals that have died of natural causes, or have been killed by other species of predators. The wolverine has powerful jaws and teeth, and it can crush the bones of dead animals to extract the nutritious marrow. Their food of carrion is mostly located by smell, as wolverines have rather poor vision. Wolverines sometimes kill their own prey. However, this only happens opportunistically, because these animals are rather slow moving and often cannot run down a healthy prey animal. Wolverines will also eat bird eggs, insect larvae, and berries when these foods are abundant. Wolverines are famous for their avaricious appetite, as is reflected in some of their alternative common names, such as glutton.

Adult wolverines are solitary animals, and they are active throughout the year. The territories of male wolverines can be very large, as much as thousands of square kilometers in extent, but shared with several resident females. Wolverines move over their territories with a persistent, loping gait, but they are also adept at climbing trees in pursuit of prey.

The fur of the wolverine is very highly regarded by northern peoples for use in the ruff around the hood of parkas. Wolverine fur is relatively effective at repelling the moisture emitted during breathing, so it does not frost up to the degree of other furs.

Wolverines are indicators of wilderness and of ecosystems that are relatively unaffected by humans. Unfortunately, trapping has eliminated wolverines from much of their natural range, and they are becoming increasingly rare in those ranges where they still manage to hang on. Currently, wolverines are classified as a vulnerable species, meaning that the species is not critically endangered or otherwise endangered, but is facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term future. The affected wolverine populations include those of Canada, the United States, Finland, Norway, Russia, and Sweden. It is critical that this special animal of wild landscapes be allowed to survive in its remaining territories, and perhaps be reintroduced to parts of its former range where suitable habitat still remains.

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Wolverine

Wolverine

The wolverine (Gulo gulo) is an uncommonly large member of the weasel family (Mustelidae) that occurs in the subarctic and boreal forests of North America and northern Eurasia. The wolverine is famous for its aggressive, combative nature and its remarkable strength. Although the wolverine is only a medium-sized animal , it can dominate much larger animals during an aggressive encounter at a food source. For example, wolverines are capable of driving away a bear, or a group of wolves, from an animal carcass. If the movement of a moose or deer is hampered by snow, it can be killed by a single, much smaller wolverine.

Wolverines typically have a body length of 5.5-8.5 ft (2-2.5 m) plus a tail of about 8-12 in (20-30 cm). Adult animals weigh 30-60 lb (14-28 kg). Female wolverines are typically smaller than males. Wolverines have a long, dense, rather lustrous fur, usually dark brown or black. They generally have lighter brown-colored bands on each side of the body, extending from the shoulders to the rump.

Wolverines are rather omnivorous in their feeding habits. They are primarily eaters of carrion, that is, animals
that have died of natural causes, or have been killed by other species of predators. The wolverine has powerful jaws and teeth, and it can crush the bones of dead animals to extract the nutritious marrow. Their food of carrion is mostly located by smell, as wolverines have rather poor vision . Wolverines sometimes kill their own prey . However, this only happens opportunistically, because these animals are rather slow moving and often cannot run down a healthy prey animal. Wolverines will also eat bird eggs, insect larvae, and berries when these foods are abundant. Wolverines are famous for their avaricious appetite, as is reflected in some of their alternative common names, such as glutton.

Adult wolverines are solitary animals, and they are active throughout the year. The territories of male wolverines can be very large, as much as thousands of square kilometers in extent, but shared with several resident females. Wolverines move over their territories with a persistent, loping gait, but they are also adept at climbing trees in pursuit of prey.

The fur of the wolverine is very highly regarded by northern peoples for use in the ruff around the hood of parkas. Wolverine fur is relatively effective at repelling the moisture emitted during breathing, so it does not frost up to the degree of other furs.

Wolverines are indicators of wilderness and of ecosystems that are relatively unaffected by humans. Unfortunately, trapping has eliminated wolverines from much of their natural range, and they are becoming increasingly rare in those ranges where they still manage to hang on. Currently, wolverines are classified as a "vulnerable" species, meaning that the species is not critically endangered or otherwise endangered, but is facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term future. The affected wolverine populations include those of Canada, the United States, Finland, Norway, Russia, and Sweden. It is critical that this special animal of wild landscapes be allowed to survive in its remaining territories, and perhaps be reintroduced to parts of its former range where suitable habitat still remains.

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