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Macon

Macon (mā´kən, mā´kŏn), city (1990 pop. 106,612), seat of Bibb co., central Ga., at the head of navigation on the Ocmulgee River; inc. 1823. It is the industrial, processing, and shipping center for a farm area that produces cotton, peanuts, soybeans, poultry, and dairy products. Chemicals and wood and metal products are among its manufactures. Fort Hawkins was established on the east side of the river in 1806 and renamed Newtown in 1821. Macon (for Nathaniel Macon) was laid out on the west side in 1823; Newtown was annexed in 1829. Wesleyan College and Mercer Univ. are there. Also in Macon are the birthplace of Sidney Lanier, several antebellum mansions, a restored grand-opera house (1884), restored Fort Hawkins (1806), a museum of arts and sciences, and a planetarium. Nearby are Robins Air Force Base and Ocmulgee National Monument.

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Mâcon

Mâcon (mäkôN´), town (1990 pop. 38,503), capital of Saône-et-Loire dept., E central France, in Burgundy, on the Saône River. It is famous for its quality wines. A transportation center, the town also has foundries and plants that manufacture motorcycles, electrical equipment, and clothing. Mâcon was acquired by the French crown in 1238, passed to Burgundy by the Treaty of Arras (1435), and was recovered by France in 1477. In the 16th cent. it was a Huguenot stronghold. Lamartine was born there.

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macon

macon Mutton, salted and smoked to resemble to bacon.

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