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Macon

Macon (mā´kən, mā´kŏn), city (1990 pop. 106,612), seat of Bibb co., central Ga., at the head of navigation on the Ocmulgee River; inc. 1823. It is the industrial, processing, and shipping center for a farm area that produces cotton, peanuts, soybeans, poultry, and dairy products. Chemicals and wood and metal products are among its manufactures. Fort Hawkins was established on the east side of the river in 1806 and renamed Newtown in 1821. Macon (for Nathaniel Macon) was laid out on the west side in 1823; Newtown was annexed in 1829. Wesleyan College and Mercer Univ. are there. Also in Macon are the birthplace of Sidney Lanier, several antebellum mansions, a restored grand-opera house (1884), restored Fort Hawkins (1806), a museum of arts and sciences, and a planetarium. Nearby are Robins Air Force Base and Ocmulgee National Monument.

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Mâcon

Mâcon (mäkôN´), town (1990 pop. 38,503), capital of Saône-et-Loire dept., E central France, in Burgundy, on the Saône River. It is famous for its quality wines. A transportation center, the town also has foundries and plants that manufacture motorcycles, electrical equipment, and clothing. Mâcon was acquired by the French crown in 1238, passed to Burgundy by the Treaty of Arras (1435), and was recovered by France in 1477. In the 16th cent. it was a Huguenot stronghold. Lamartine was born there.

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macon

macon Mutton, salted and smoked to resemble to bacon.

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Mâcon

MÂCON

MÂCON , capital of the department of Saône-et-Loire, E. France. The first *Church council of Mâcon (583) issued a series of decisions concerning the Jews. However, the first specific record of the presence of Jews in Mâcon dates from about 820, when *Agobard, archbishop of Lyons, began missionary activity among Jewish children at Mâcon who were sent to Arles for safety; he also arranged for the delivery of sermons condemning friendly relations between Christians and Jews. From 886 Jews are mentioned as owners of fields, and especially vineyards, on the outskirts of Mâcon and its surroundings, in at least 15 villages and places where they cultivated the land themselves. The Jewish quarter developed in Bourgneuf. The cemetery was situated not far from Pont Jeu, formerly known as Pont des Juifs. Several medieval Hebrew tombstones have been discovered, some of which are preserved in the Museum of Mâcon. Not far from the site of the cemetery, there was a house commonly known by the name Sabbat, a term sometimes employed in Burgundy for synagogue. In 1378, the municipality attempted to compulsorily segregate the 18 Jews still living in Mâcon in a separate quarter. They were expelled from the town in 1394. During the 17th and 18th centuries, Jews of Avignon visited Mâcon and its surroundings to trade. At the beginning of World War ii, there were about 50 Jewish families living in Mâcon, but they were not organized into a community. The postwar community, consisting mainly of arrivals from North Africa, numbered 200 in 1969.

bibliography:

Gross, Gal Jud, 339f.; B. Blumenkranz, Juifs et chrétiens (1960), index s.v.Mâcon and Concile de Mâcon; idem, in: Bulletin philologique et historique 1959 (1960), 129–36; G. Jeanton, in: Annales de l'Académie de Mâcon, 20 (1917), 381ff.; idem, Le Vieux Mâcon (1934), 9ff., 81ff.; Loeb, in: rej, 5 (1882), 104ff.; Z. Szajkowski, Analytical Franco-Jewish Gazetteer 19391945 (1966), 255.

[Bernhard Blumenkranz]

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