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San Andreas fault

San Andreas fault, great fracture (see fault) of the earth's crust in California. It is the principal fault of an intricate network of faults extending more than 600 mi (965 km) from NW California to the Gulf of California. The San Andreas fault, a strike-slip fault, also extends vertically at least 20 mi (30 km) into the earth. It is located on the boundary between two sections of the earth's lithosphere—the North American plate and the Pacific plate (see plate tectonics)—and separates SW California from the North American continent. The Pacific plate is moving northwest in relation to the North American plate, and it is believed that the total displacement along the fault since its formation more than 30 million years ago has been about 350 mi (560 km). Movement along the fault causes earthquakes; several thousand occur annually, although only a few are of moderate or higher magnitude. The destructive San Francisco earthquake of 1906 was caused by a movement in which land surfaces on either side of the fault were displaced horizontally up to 21 ft (6.4 m).

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San Andreas fault

San Andreas fault Geological fault line extending more than 965km (600mi) through California. It lies on the boundary between the North American and the Eastern Pacific plates of the Earth's crust. Plate tectonic movement causes several thousand earthquakes each year, although only a few are significant. San Francisco lies close to the fault line, and is prone to earthquake damage. The most destructive earthquake occurred in 1906, when it horizontally displaced land around the fault by up to 6.4m (21ft) and killed 503 people. Notable tremors also occurred in 1989 and 1994.

http://usgs.gov/gip/earthq3

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San Andreas fault

San Andreas fault a fault line extending through the length of coastal California. Seismic activity is common along its course and is due to two crustal plates sliding past each other along the line of the fault. The city of San Francisco lies close to the fault, and such movement caused the devastating earthquake of 1906 and a further convulsion in 1989.

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